Archive | May, 2006

Take my pension, please

Never exactly straightforward, union-management relations sometimes produce curious alliances, and an odd pairing has emerged as the pilots union at Delta joins with the airline’s management to fend off a longtime labour ally. Unions after all would seem a natural ally of the government’s pensions watchdog, the federally backed Pension Benefit Guarantee Corporation, but Delta’s […]

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Far(ther) from the madding crowd

Yogi Berra, the malapropos-prone baseball player, once declined an invitation to a popular New York restaurant because “it’s so crowded, no one goes there any more.” With airports, could that be the case? Not in Phoenix, where the main airport’s getting crowded. But ‘Don’t build a new runway. Buy another airport,’ was the idea city […]

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Will Sabena ride again?

As SN Brussels prepares to merge with Virgin Express and operate under a single brand in autumn, bets are on to guess the new airline’s name (see also http://www.luchtzak.be/article11492.html). And, with SN retaining rights to the Sabena name, there’s talk that the moniker might ride again. But some might question the wisdom of associating with […]

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Aviation’s TV turn on

This blog brings you news of two of the latest TV shows made by very different parts of the industry. The first is our very own Flight Group’s “Flight TV“, which produced three pieces from the recent Berlin ILA Air Show covering commercial air transport, defence and business aviation. Rather good it is too, although […]

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So long, Long Beach

Out in Southern California, where a historical site is anything older than the latest drive-through, they were getting nostalgic the other day. But this passage is noteworthy: production of commercial airliners in Long Beach, birthplace of the DC-3, has ended with the delivery of the last Boeing 717s from the old Douglas Aircraft Co. factory […]

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Stand up and take a bow, or perhaps just sit down

They call it the Newspaper of Record, or the Grey Lady, but they read it. The New York Times is in fact one of the most trusted papers in the world. So people paid attention when it ran a front-page story on a plan by airframers to get more revenue out of a large airliner […]

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The melancholy prince, the governator and the virgin

Getting off the ground has never been easy for startup airlines, but a high-profile effort by friends of high-flying Virgin chief Richard Branson has been stalled at the regulatory gate. Now, Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, and Arnold Schwarzenegger, the ‘Terminator’ of Hollywood fame, are involved in the long-running bid by Virgin America to get clearance […]

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London City: the capital’s most interesting airport?

A couple of stories about London City Airport, a neat east London gateway for a steadily rising number of business travellers, appeared at the outset of this week that give this editor the chance to get a little nostalgic. It’s a trifle sad, I concede, to have a fondness for airports, but I admit that […]

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A Decade after the Disaster

It’s been a decade since one of the worst airline disasters in modern US aviation, but in the 10 years since a ValuJet DC-9 plunged into the Florida Everglades just minutes after taking off from Miami’s airport with flammable matter in its hold – oxygen canisters that burst into superheated flame that brought down the […]

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Foreign affairs

Boston dignitaries are taking a second look at two airports in New England that aren’t in Boston but want to use the name. First off was the airport in Manchester, New Hampshire, about 55 miles northwest of Boston’s Logan International Airport, and the site of one of the first forays more than a decade ago […]

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