Archive | February, 2014

Straight & Level 25 February

You’re not the one that I want John Travolta has revealed that he has stopped flying his Boeing 707. The actor and aviator told Steve Wright on BBC Radio 2 that he is retiring the former Qantas airliner – one of several aircraft he owns. Travolta has been owner of the 707-138B, registration N707JT, since […]

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Week on the web 25 February

In the DEW Line blog, Craig Hoyle asks whether Boeing’s Super Hornet has a long term future, after rejections by India and Brazil and the looming end to a multi-year procurement deal for the US Navy. “Pressure is mounting on Boeing to secure extra orders,” Hoyle says. “The question is whether the raft of Advanced […]

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Learning from the Norwegians

This first appeared as a Comment in the 25 February issue of Flight International In its review of offshore oil support helicopter safety, the UK Civil Aviation Authority has admitted it could learn from the Norwegians who, since 1999, have seen better results in their sector of the North Sea. Since 2000 Norway has had […]

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Room for manoeuvre

This first appeared as a Comment in the 25 February issue of Flight International Back in 2005, Virgin Atlantic offered a glimpse of the in-flight services passengers might enjoy when its Airbus A380s entered service at the end of the decade. They included a casino, beauty parlours, a gym and private double beds. Virgin’s vision […]

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Material benefits

Rolls-Royce may be quite late down the composites path, but the UK engine maker is now firmly behind a project to develop fan blades using non-metalic materials. For our cover story this week, Andrew Doyle has spoken to the company’s senior engineers about their work, including on the Trent 1000-based advanced lightweight low-pressure system (ALPS) demonstrator. Down […]

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Straight & Level 18 February

Parachuting back to 1944 To mark the 70th anniversary of the Normandy invasion, a group of enthusiasts plans to re-enact the parachute drops from C-47 Douglas Dakota aircraft that helped the allies secure key bridgeheads in the hours before the seaborne assault. The Round Canopy Parachuting Team plans to assemble restored Dakotas from around the […]

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Week on the web 18 February

On his Ariel View blog, Arie Egozi says linking simulators to a network could be a “winning combination when it comes to preparing air forces for warfare”. He uses the Israeli air force’s new Rangeless Helicopter Training and Safety System (HTS) to illustrate his point. During a ground-based demonstration late last year, HTS replicated the […]

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Launches aplenty, but still thinking to do

(This first appeared as a Comment in the 18 February issue of Flight International) Helicopters are one of the quiet success stories in the aviation industry. The airline buying spree of the last few years gets the attention, but helicopter sales have been at least keeping pace. Rising demand for aircraft with vertical take-off capability […]

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A chance to do it right

(This first appeared as a Comment in the 18 February issue of Flight International) Getting an aviation industry executive to comment meaningfully on the record about a possible new product years ahead of a potential launch is not an easy task. The scripted response to such queries is a series of banalities always prefixed with […]

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War over widebodies

The front cover of the latest Flight International (18 February) shows the Airbus A350-900, with the Qatar Airways Boeing 787 in the background, parked on the static at this week’s Singapore air show. The coverline – War over widebodies – refers to Max Kingsley-Jones’s piece, filed from the show, about how the big two airframers […]

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