Straight & Level 12 February

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BA takes its tea to new heightsTired of the laws of thermodynamics standing in the way of a decent cuppa, British Airways (come on, who else?) has started offering a new altitude-resistant blend of tea to its customers.Let’s spare you the tedious discourse on vapour pressure and the Clausius-Clapeyron equation. The upshot is that water’s […]

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The agony of not knowing

(The following first appeared as a Comment article in Flight International, 12-18 February 2013) One thing that characterises managers in any industry or region is that they work hard to give the impression they’re in control – even if they don’t know what’s going on. So, when they don’t know what’s going on and admit […]

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The agony of not knowing

(The following first appeared as a Comment article in Flight International, 12-18 February 2013) One thing that characterises managers in any industry or region is that they work hard to give the impression they’re in control – even if they don’t know what’s going on. So, when they don’t know what’s going on and admit […]

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Fooling no-one

(The following first appeared as the lead Comment in the 12 February 2013 issue of Flight International) Iran’s rollout of its Qaher-313 “stealth fighter” is little more than a poorly executed propaganda stunt for domestic consumption. It is immediately apparent from the many photos and video imagery of the purported “advanced aircraft” with a “very […]

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The future of the UK’s airborne assets and Iran’s dubious stealth fighter

A UK Royal Air Force Panavia Tornado GR4 is the cover feature star of this week’s Flight International (12 February), in which Defence Editor Craig Hoyle takes a look at what the Ministry of Defence’s 10-year equipment plan means for the country’s various airborne assets. Meanwhile, Dave Majumdar examines the claims being made by Iran for […]

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Straight & Level 5 February

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St Maarten lands best approachSt Maarten in the Caribbean – where airliners cast a shadow over seaside sunbathers as they come into land – has been voted the world’s most spectacular airport approach. The holiday destination beat another island, and last year’s winner, Barra in the Outer Hebrides – the only airport where scheduled aircraft […]

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Nominate your heroes of aerospace

They have ranged from test pilots to mould-breaking designers, entrepreneurs to airline bosses. The search is on for the recipients of this year’s Flightglobal Achievement Awards – those who have caught your eye as the star performers of 2012. We are looking for nominations in three categories: Aviator, Innovator and Leader of the Year. You can […]

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The dangers of get-downitis

(This first appeared as the second Comment in Flight International, 5 February 2013) Pilots have a loose term – “get-down-itis” – for the creeping desire to push an unstable approach when procedures, meteorological consideration or sheer common sense would normally demand a go-around.However, preliminary information from the Red Wings Tupolev Tu-204 accident in Moscow might […]

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US superiority at risk

(The following appeared as the lead Comment article in Flight International, 5 February 2013) The US Air Force must invest in technologies if its fleet of aggressor aircraft is to accurately replicate the air forces of potential adversaries. History shows that air combat skills are highly perishable, and constant vigilance needed to maintain fighter pilots’ […]

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787 – electrical storm

Our coverage of the 787 crisis continues with our cover feature this week (Flight International 5 February) entitled Electrical storm. In it, Stephen Trimble examines the history behind Boeing’s decision to opt for revolutionary lithium-ion batteries for the Dreamliner, and where the investigation goes from here. Meanwhile, David Kaminski-Morrow looks at why Airbus is sticking […]

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