Archive | April, 2007

And you thought air transport was dysfunctional…

A comforting story for any of you who despair over working in the chronically value-destroying, customer-disappointing, economically perverse world of air transport. I may have this wrong (if you read the link above you’ll sympathise with me) but it seems that the private-sector leasing company that provides coaches to British train companies has so much […]

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And you thought the Airbus A380 wiring was bad…

A comforting story for the poor guys at Airbus in Hamburg who found the A380 wiring coming up a metre or so short. Things could be much worse – as the Indian Navy has reportedly just been told by the folks refitting the Russian aircraft carrier Gorshokov for sale to them. Seems the engineers underestimated […]

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What do M-ICRO, M-YJET and M-ONEY have in common?

By Helen Massy-Beresford The answer is that they will all represent aircraft registered on the Isle of Man aircraft registry once it begins operating on 1 May.

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Military crash investigations too quick, or civilians too slow?

The Blue Angels crash last week has provoked extensive debate and I was interested to see this comment turning up regarding the durations of military and civil investigations.

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Something odd really is going on with Ryanair at Girona

It’s not the most important story in the world, but I’ve got personal experience of this story in The Times regarding strange goings-on at the Ryanair operation at Girona in Spain.

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Gamco: that ‘small’ hangar fire in full

It’s official: the 19 April night-time fire at Gulf Aircraft Maintenance’s hangar in Abu Dhabi was brought under “quick control” and “contained expeditiously”, a line dutifully repeated by the Arab press later that day, thereby sparing Gamco the indignity of having to wipe too much umm ali off its face. But in a world where […]

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No more Mr. Nice Guy: Hawker Beechcraft’s AT-6

JD O’Malley (right) is teaching an “old” training aircraft some new — and lethal — tricks. O’Malley is a company pilot for Hawker Beechcraft, the aircraft maker formerly known as Raytheon. He was in Washington last week as part of an extended campaign to introduce military brass, politicians and journalists (like me on the left) […]

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The rise and rise of new space

The promise Rocketplane-Kistler, SpaceX, Virgin Galactic and their cohorts hold out is the realisation of all of us being able to go where only a few highly trained professionals have gone before. Watching the Apollo astronauts go to the Moon people everywhere could imagine that 2001 would be a universe of space hotels and lunar excursions.

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Meeting Michael O’Leary

Ryanair’s chief executive Michael O’Leary is well known for his bombastic public persona and ruthless management style, but what’s he like when you meet him on business?

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Energia-ology: Is Sevastianov about to fall from grace?

One regret that Cold War watchers had with the demise of the Soviet Union in 1991 was the end of Kremlinology, the “science” that attempted to ascertain Soviet intentions from the few photographed appearences and statements of the then ruling Communist Party’s leadership. Whether you like President Putin’s Russia or not, its new found oil wealth and increased spaceflight investment is going to bring about a more lively and interesting Russian scene with the added spice of Kremlinology, much missed for more than a decade.

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