UK CAA catches up with Learmount

To be fair, it didn’t take them long, and they must have been working on it already.





Two blog entries before this one (starting with “…all the way to impact”) deal with the subject directly, and many of the earlier posts deal with the consequences of failure by the non-flying pilot to monitor – critically and with intervention if necessary – whether the pilot flying is actually delivering the flight trajectory you would expect at any given stage of the flight.


Here is a list of accidents that could have been prevented by the monitoring pilot:


  • 2010 Afriqiyah Airways A330-200, Tripoli, Libya (103 killed)
  • 2010 Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737-800, Nr Beirut (90)
  • 2009 Yemenia Airbus A310-200, Comoros Islands (152)
  • 2009 Air France A330-300, South Atlantic (228)
  • 2009 Caspian Airlines Tu-154M, Iran (168)
  • 2009 Colgan Air Dash 8 Q400, Buffalo, NY, USA (49)
  • 2008 Aeroflot Nord 737-500, Perm, Russia (88)
  • 2007 Adam Air Boeing 737-400, Java Sea near Sulawesi (102)
  • 2006 Armavia Airbus A320-200, Sochi (113)
  • 2005 West Caribbean, MD-82, Venezuela (160)
  • 2004 Pinnacle Airlines, CRJ200, Jefferson City, USA (2)
  • 2004 Flash Airlines 737-300, Sharm el-Sheikh (148)
  • 2000 Gulf Air A320-200, Bahrain (143)
  • 2000 Crossair Saab 340B, Nr Zurich, Switzerland (10)
  • 1996 Aero Peru, 757, Lima (70 killed)
  • 1995 Birgenair/Alas Nacionales, 757, Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic (189)



Monitoring followed, where necessary, by intervention, could have saved 1,815 lives.
And this list is by no means exhaustive.

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