Tag Archives | airline safety

Just an ordinary accident?

I never thought I’d be relieved to hear that an airline accident was probably an “ordinary” one. But after the trauma (no, it is not too strong a word) of Malaysia Airlines’ double misfortune, early information about the Air Algerie/Swiftair Boeing MD-83 indicates its crash cause is likely to be related to bad weather at […]

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Where’s the safety incentive when accidents don’t happen?

Global airline accident statistics for the first six months of this year are staggeringly good – if you don’t include MH370. And for the purposes of this argument I am not including it. MH370 is missing, no trace of the aircraft or the 239 people on board has been found so far, and the official […]

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Airlines failed to maintain 2012′s safety high in 2013

Airline fatal accidents hit an all-time low in 2012, but last year the airlines proved they couldn’t keep safety at that level for long. In fact the 2012 figures had broken safety records so convincingly that Flight International predicted the figures would probably be a one-year “spike”. Maybe it was, but not a dramatic one […]

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The future of safety oversight

At the EASA/FAA annual conference last week, in Paris, I was moderating the final plenary session, which is about summing up what has been debated over the previous two days.  A great deal of the debate had been about regulatory resources, and how regulators will meet their safety oversight obligations in the future as the […]

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