Tag Archives | James Stamp

Analyst calls for UK politicians to declare airport support

As the Airport Commission approaches its conclusions and a general election looms, the City of London wants political party leaders to declare their hand now on airports policy in the new government. James Stamp, KPMG’s head of transport puts it particularly clearly: “We welcome the progress being made by the Airports Commission. However, we believe […]

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How to be safer than very safe

Today’s generation of modern jet airliners has achieved a historic safety performance high of less than one fatal accident in ten million flights, according to Harry Nelson, adviser to Airbus’ head of product safety. The challenge now, said Nelson, is to determine what can be done to improve even further. This ratio – one in 10-7 - […]

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Pilot inflight collapse: Germany investigates cabin air poisons

Following the copilot’s collapse with nausea from oil fumes in the cockpit air on an Air Berlin flight from Milan Malpensa to Dusseldorf in November, German accident investigator BFU has taken the unprecedented step of sending a blood sample from the copilot for analysis to a specialist scientific organisation. From previous experience the BFU knew […]

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EFBs: where do you stop?

At the National Business Aircraft Association conference and exhibition in Las Vegas earlier this month one of the phenomena was that everyone who is anyone was offering an iPad app to enable easy access the service they provided. The premise, presumably, is that most pilots have an iPad, and anyone who doesn’t soon will. Are […]

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‘A profession in decline’

William Langewiesche’s book “Fly By Wire” is about the ‘miracle on the Hudson’ – the successful ditching in the river of a US Airways Airbus A320 commanded by Capt Chesley Sullenberger with Jeffrey Skiles as his copilot. For me the book’s fascination was the author’s view on what being a modern airline pilot is all about. Langiewische is an experienced […]

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Airline pilots ‘have not been trained for modern aircraft’

A draft FAA study into the relationship of pilots with today’s airliner flightdecks – specifically the automated systems in the cockpits - provides the hard data to prove that pilots are not properly trained for modern cockpits. The result has been serious accidents that did not need to happen. I have been arguing for ages that airline pilot recurrent training […]

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Volcanic ash: who says flying’s not safe?

The problems with decisionmaking about whether to fly – or not – in the volcanic-ash-affected skies over Europe is that so little is known about these circumstances. The situation is unique in that this ash cloud is affecting a large area of intense aviation activity.   The Met Office weather research Dornier 228 at work Vocanoes somewhere on the planet […]

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The unvarnished truth about all airline accidents

The following statements apply to all accidents involving all airlines flying all types of aircraft, whether people in them were hurt or not: 1. If the accident involves a big Western-built jet airliner with lots of people on it, it will either be an Airbus or a Boeing, because they are the only Western aircraft manufacturers left on the […]

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The A380 shows off Airbus’ clever new kit

This group has just disembarked after a 27 May A380 flight from Airbus’ Toulouse base. The flight was mounted to demonstrate two really clever and seriously useful avionic advances that Airbus is just about to see certificated. One will make airborne collision a little less likely, the other will prevent runway overruns. Overruns are the most common type of aircraft accident, and one of the most […]

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NASA boldly going where man has been before?

Is NASA barking up the wrong tree with its “large transport aircraft upset recovery research programme?” While I’m sure that the human factors, physiological and psychological results of testing pilots in centrifuges will be scientifically interesting, I’m not so sure they will be useful. NASA is not the first organisation to do research on why […]

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