Boeing gives us the IFE facts

Did you know that in-flight entertainment (IFE) is the second most expensive item on the modern commercial jet (after the engines), and that it is the most complex system on board the airplane in terms of the amount of wiring, individual components, and lines of software code?

Well now you do. In a unique advertisement in the latest edition of Avion, the WAEA’s official publication, readers were presented with some interesting IFE facts care of Boeing (click on pic below). Wanna know my favorite fact?

“When looking across the life of the airplane…the IFE system may actually become the most expensive procured item if an airline converts to an updated system during that span.”

One way to avoid such a costly retrofit, of course, if for an airline to acquire state-of-the-art IFE in advance of aircraft delivery (if and when it can).

But shouldn’t the same logic extend to connectivity, especially since IFE and C (IFEC) are becoming inextricably linked these days?

What airline wants to bolt on a pricey connectivity system to a brand new just-rolled-off-the-line bird?

Don’t put your hands up all at once.

Boeing facts.jpg

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3 Responses to Boeing gives us the IFE facts

  1. aviationpilottraining.com October 27, 2009 at 5:28 am #

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  2. Ron Amundson October 27, 2009 at 8:12 am #

    IFEC will likely be tricky to manage, as its life span is so much shorter than the airframe. Then add in having to rip up and redo legacy infrastructure as technology changes… it will be a real pain down the road.

  3. MoJoh October 27, 2009 at 10:52 am #

    ‘a real pain down the road’?

    Airlines and IFE vendors have been installing and retrofitting systems for more than 20 years.

    It may be expensive, unreliable and painful for the operators, maintainers and cabin crew but passengers have come to expect the service so airlines will continue to suffer the cost and hardship.

    The face of IFEC may be changing but there will always be a place for it.