CSAR: John Young asks “why?”

Pentagon acquisition chief John Young really got on a roll last week. In addition to attacking the costs and reliability of the US Air Force’s prized F-22, Young also questioned the fundamental need for combat search and rescue helicopters. Of course, you might like to think that these kinds of doubts could be sorted out before Young’s office allows the US Air to spend three years trying — in vain — to award a $15 billion CSAR-X contract.

Mike Sirak at Air Force Magazine’s Daily Report writes today:




Don’t Leave Us Stranded: Speakingto reporters Nov. 20, John Young, Pentagon acquisition executive,essentially burst the bubble of those who thought that the need for anew Air Force combat search and rescue helicopter was universallysupported within the walls of the Pentagon. In fact, Young said he’snot even convinced that the rescue community “has to have its own setof assets for the occasional rescue mission when we have new thingscoming online like V-22s and other things that could be pressed intoservice.” Young maintained that there are “a lot of assets that couldbe used in rescue missions with planning.” He asserted, too, that arescue mission would be a “come-as-you-are” operation “unless all ofthese CSAR assets are prepositioned for that.” (Yes, Mr. Young, therescue assets are deployed to the combat theater and those other assetshave jobs.) Young recently went on the record expressing his displeasurewith the Air Force’s decision to delay announcing the winner in theCSAR-X contest until next year, so we don’t think he’s out to kill theprogram. He apparently was trying to use the CSAR-X as an example ofhow the “intensity” of parochial interests may adversely affect thebest use of resources across the military enterprise. So much so, hecontended, that the new Administration may well want to “revisit” theenterprise-vs.-community topic. (New to CSAR-X? Read The Struggle over CSAR-X .)
–Michael C. Sirak

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2 Responses to CSAR: John Young asks “why?”

  1. Mike 26 November, 2008 at 10:50 pm #

    Jesus Christ, the man’s a menace!

    Apparently he hasn’t heard of the complete cluster-fuck that was CSAR during Desert Storm, when there were no organic CSAR platforms and the mission was outsourced to various SOCOM aviation units, who got around to the CSAR mission right after they had finished resupplying every single last SOCOM team they had running around Iraq. The end result was that a downed airman wandered around the Iraqi desert for days waiting for rescue before he was finally captured.

  2. Wedding Photography Indiana 10 November, 2010 at 9:33 pm #

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