Top News on Baghdad International

  • PICTURES: Air Force blasts disabled C-130 in Iraq


    <P>Miliary explosvies experts this week <A href="http://www.sather.afnews.af.mil/news/story_media.asp?id=123105653">blasted&nbsp;</A>a diabled Air Force <A href="http://www.lockheedmartin.com/products/c130/index.html">C-130&nbsp;Hercules</A> into smaller pieces to remove the damaged cargo plane from a field northeast of the Baghdad International airport.</P> <P>Explosives ordinance disposal troops from the 447th Expeditionary Civil Engineering Squadron based at Sather Air Base in Iraq between 7-9 July <A href="http://www.dvidshub.net/vjump.php?vid=41427">placed&nbsp;the explosives on the wings </A>and later on the fuselage&nbsp;of the aircraft,&nbsp;using controlled detonations to divide the aircraft with into smaller sections for removal. </P> <P> <TABLE style="WIDTH: 445px" cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TH>&nbsp;<IMG style="WIDTH: 450px; HEIGHT: 299px" alt="" src="../assets/getAsset.aspx?ItemID=23849" border=0></TH></TR> <TR> <TD> <H6 align=right>&n


  • Other News for Baghdad International

  • PICTURES: Air Force blasts disabled C-130 in Iraq


    <P>Miliary explosvies experts this week <A ...


  • News Listings for Baghdad International

  • PICTURES: Air Force blasts disabled C-130 in Iraq

    News | 11 Jul 2008 16:08 | John Croft

    <P>Miliary explosvies experts this week <A href="http://www.sather.afnews.af.mil/news/story_media.asp?id=123105653">blasted&nbsp;</A>a diabled Air Force <A href="http://www.lockheedmartin.com/products/c130/index.html">C-130&nbsp;Hercules</A> into smaller pieces to remove the damaged cargo plane from a field northeast of the Baghdad International airport.</P> <P>Explosives ordinance disposal troops from the 447th Expeditionary Civil Engineering Squadron based at Sather Air Base in Iraq between 7-9 July <A href="http://www.dvidshub.net/vjump.php?vid=41427">placed&nbsp;the explosives on the wings </A>and later on the fuselage&nbsp;of the aircraft,&nbsp;using controlled detonations to divide the aircraft with into smaller sections for removal. </P> <P> <TABLE style="WIDTH: 445px" cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0> <TBODY> <TR> <TH>&nbsp;<IMG style="WIDTH: 450px; HEIGHT: 299px" alt="" src="../assets/getAsset.aspx?ItemID=23849" border=0></TH></TR> <TR> <TD> <H6 align=right>&nhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/PICTURES-Air-Force-blasts-disabled-C-130-in-Iraq-225290/
  • IRAQI MOVE

    News | 21 Mar 2006 00:00

    <P><BR>The Iraqi air force’s 23 Sqn began operations from the service’s New Al Muthana airbase – part of Baghdad International airport – on 7 March. It is equipped with three ex-US Air Force Lockheed Martin C-130E transports. </P>http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/IRAQI-MOVE-205536/
  • Off the Ground

    News | 15 Nov 2005 00:00

    Rebuilding the Iraqi air force after two Gulf wars and years of decline is proving a challenge for the interim Iraqi government and the coalition forceshttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Off-the-Ground-202818/
  • UK hunts Hercules crash clues

    News | 08 Feb 2005 00:00

    <p>The UK Ministry of Defence has yet to disclose the cause of a Lockheed Martin C-130K Hercules transport aircraft crash that killed nine Royal Air Force personnel and one British Army soldier in Iraq on 30 January. The 49 Squadron-operated aircraft was lost en route to Balad airbase after leaving Baghdad International airport on a routine sortie, it says.</p> <p>An investigation has now been completed at the crash site around 30km (18 miles) north west of Baghdad, says the MoD, which declines to comment on the team's initial findings. &quot;A thorough and extensive search of the crash site has taken place [and] we are continuing to investigate the full circumstances,&quot; it says. &quot;We are satisfied that in the operational circumstances as thorough a search as possible has been conducted.&quot;</p> <p>The MoD refuses to respond to Iraqi insurgent group claims that the transport was shot down, pending the outcome of its investigation. <i style='mso-bidi-font-style:normal'>Flighhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/UK-hunts-Hercules-crash-clues-193578/
  • Iraqi air force re-equips with donated C-130 fleet

    News | 08 Feb 2005 00:00

    <p>The transformation of the Iraqi air force gathered pace last month as the fledgling service accepted three surplus Lockheed Martin C-130Etransports from the US government during a ceremony at Baghdad International airport.</p> <p>Attended by prime minister Iyad Allawi, the acceptance came ahead of the completion of a training course in Jordan for around 65 Iraqi air force personnel, including four flightcrews. The USAir Force is also supporting this process by providing simulator time.</p> <p>Iraqi pilots have yet to fly the C-130, but once cleared for service the aircraft will enter use with the Iraqi air force's re-activated 23 Sqn at Baghdad's Muthenna airbase.</p> <p>In a further development in the regeneration of the Iraqi armed forces, the country's formative army is set to gain six Mil Mi-24 combat helicopters from Poland following Warsaw's completion of a peacekeeping commitment in the country. The aircraft, which began operations in Iraq late last month, are due to be rehttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Iraqi-air-force-re-equips-with-donated-C-130-fleet-193615/
  • Pilots relive Iraq missile attack

    News | 09 Nov 2004 00:00

    <p>Story emerges of how DHL crew controlled stricken A300 to a landing at Baghdad in November 2003</p> <p>Full details are emerging of how the crew of the DHL Airbus A300B4 freighter that was struck by a missile near Baghdad International airport in November 2003 succeeded in landing the aircraft back at the airfield. All three hydraulic systems on the twinjet were drained, so the crew suffered complete loss of all the flight controls - but the engines kept operating. </p> <p>When it was hit by the SA-14 missile, the aircraft's left wingtip was severely damaged and on fire, the A300 rapidly lost hydraulic pressure from all its three systems, depriving the pilots of all flight controls, slats and flaps. </p> <p>After the missile struck at about 8,000ft (2,440m) the aircraft initially continued its climb away from the airport, but when flight engineer Mario Rofail summed up the hydraulic problems the pilots realised they would not regain their flight controls. </p> <p>Airbus has sinchttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Pilots-relive-Iraq-missile-attack-189818/