Top News on Boeing E-3 Sentry

  • USAF: F-35B cannot generate enough sorties to replace A-10


    The US Air Force has concluded that the short take-off vertical landing (STOVL) Lockheed Martin F-35B- model aircraft cannot generate enough sorties to meet...


  • Other News for Boeing E-3 Sentry

  • USAF: F-35B cannot generate enough sorties to replace A-10


    The US Air Force has concluded that the short take-off vertical landing (STOVL) Lockheed Martin F-35B- model aircraft...


  • Boeing confident of Australian Wedgetail review


    Boeing is confident that a review of Australia's delayed Wedgetail airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) system...


  • News Listings for Boeing E-3 Sentry

  • USAF: F-35B cannot generate enough sorties to replace A-10

    News | 16 May 2012 20:53 | Dave Majumdar

    The US Air Force has concluded that the short take-off vertical landing (STOVL) Lockheed Martin F-35B- model aircraft cannot generate enough sorties to meet...http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/USAF-F-35B-cannot-generate-enough-sorties-to-replace-A-10-371985/
  • Boeing confident of Australian Wedgetail review

    News | 18 May 2009 14:00 | Stephen Trimble

    Boeing is confident that a review of Australia's delayed Wedgetail airborne early warning and control (AEW&C) system programme will support the technology...http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Boeing-confident-of-Australian-Wedgetail-review-326679/
  • Saudi Arabia's changing military industry

    News | 07 Apr 2008 15:00 | Jon Lake

    Saudi Arabia Local heroes "Saudization" will reduce the number of jobs for foreigners in the long term, but prospects for trainers and managers...http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Saudi-Arabias-changing-military-industry-222792/
  • Rockwell to make combat waves

    News | 01 Nov 2005 00:00

    <p>TTNT wideband networking technology chosen by Pentagon to connect US aircraft heads for integration programme</p><p>The US Department of Defensehas selected Rockwell Collins’ Tactical Targeting Networking Technology (TTNT) to serve as the core capability to connect US Air Force and Navy fighters, bombers and command-and-control aircraft with a low-latency, wideband network dubbed the airbornenetworking waveform.</p><p>Jointly sponsored by the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Air Force Research Laboratory, TTNT will resolve a critical part of making network-centric aviation operations a reality. </p><p>The selection of the Collins technology over an emerging rival waveform called FAST was confirmed on 14 October by Lt Gen William Hobbins, deputy chief of staff for warfighting integration. “TTNT is a technological solution that enables network-centric operations among our airborne assets,” he says.</p><p>Combat aircraft require a highly flexible and fast nehttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Rockwell-to-make-combat-waves-202522/
  • Baghdad raid takes 12min from targeting to attack

    News | 14 Apr 2003 23:00

    <p>Fast decision-making and co-ordinate setting by USAF led to lightning strike by B-1B</p> <p>The7 April strike on a building in Baghdad thought to contain Saddam Hussein and his sons showed how sensor-to-shooter times are being reduced. During the strike a Rockwell B-1B dropped four 950kg (2,000lb) Boeing GBU-31 JDAMGPS-guided bombs 12min after receiving the target co-ordinates.</p> <p>Lt Col Fred Swan, one of two weapon systems officers on the 405th Air Expeditionary Wing B-1 says:" We were just coming off the tanker in western Iraq with another target area that we were planned to go to, and we were retasked to this target. From the time we got the co-ordinates, it took 12 minutes to get the bombs on target."</p> <p>Reducing the time between identifying targets and launching an attack was a key lesson learned during the 1991 Gulf War and subsequent conflicts. One defence analyst says: "The key is not just the targeting, but also the decision-making and the time to make the decisihttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Baghdad-raid-takes-12min-from-targeting-to-attack-164294/
  • Force multipliers in demand

    News | 11 Mar 2003 00:00

    <p>STEWART PENNEY / LONDON</p> <p>The six members of the Gulf Co-operation Council (GCC) have relatively modern air forces, but not every country has a national training system, and force multipliers such as airborne early warning (AEW), in-flight refuelling platforms and maritime patrol aircraft (MPA) are in short supply. </p> <p>Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates have discussed joint GCC procurements, and signed a deal with Raytheon for an air defence ground environment. Other proposals for combined GCC procurements include AEW and MPA platforms. Indeed, all GCC members have some form of AEW requirement, including Saudi Arabia, which wants to bolster its Boeing E-3 Sentry fleet. Whether a joint programme can be agreed remains to be seen.</p> <p>Several of the countries are also viewed as having transport requirements, with the Lockheed Martin C-130J considered lead contender.</p> <p>For now, however, each GCC member has its own wishlist. Saudihttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Force-multipliers-in-demand-162686/