Top News on Cassini-Huygens

  • Robospace: Star moments in robotic space exploration


    ​At the end of a week that saw the European Space Agency turn heads the world over by achieving the first-ever soft landing on a comet, we look at the most dazzling achievements in five decades of robotic space exploration.


  • Other News for Cassini-Huygens

  • UK could use plutonium in space nuclear power demonstration


    The European Space Agency Harwell site will research nuclear power for spacecraft, but who provides the plutonium?


  • News Listings for Cassini-Huygens

  • Robospace: Star moments in robotic space exploration

    News | 14 Nov 2014 17:06 | Dan Thisdell

    ​At the end of a week that saw the European Space Agency turn heads the world over by achieving the first-ever soft landing on a comet, we look at the most dazzling achievements in five decades of robotic space exploration.http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Robospace-Star-moments-in-robotic-space-exploration-406098/
  • UK could use plutonium in space nuclear power demonstration

    News | 15 Feb 2010 15:00 | Rob Coppinger

    The European Space Agency Harwell site will research nuclear power for spacecraft, but who provides the plutonium?http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/UK-could-use-plutonium-in-space-nuclear-power-demonstration-338369/
  • Galileo displays versatile Falco UAV

    News | 14 Jun 2005 00:00

    <P>Galileo Avionica (Hall2, D19) is exhibiting its Falco MAE/UAV, a tactical unmanned air vehicle for airborne surveillance, identification, maritime and border patrol, in the display area. Falco can also be used for target identification and classification.<BR><BR>The UAV can operate for up to 14h and carry a 70kg (150 lb) payload, including EOST 45, the integrated multi-sensor FLIR, colour TV, or a laser range finder.<BR><BR>The company is also exhibiting its complete range of airborne equipment on the Finmeccanica stand (Hall 2A, D19). <BR><BR>This includes the ATOS (airborne tactical observation and surveillance), a maritime patrol mission system for fixed wing aircraft and helicopters, based on a modular lightweight design <BR><BR><STRONG>Demonstrating</STRONG><BR><BR>It is also demonstrating its PAR (precision approach radar), which is currently in use in eight countries, with orders placed by a further 50. Available with different antennas for fixed and mobile applications, PARhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Galileo-displays-versatile-Falco-UAV-199399/
  • NASA/ESA to discuss Europa

    News | 29 Mar 2005 00:00

    <p>The European Space Agency and NASA have set up a small science group to discuss a potential joint mission to Jupiter's moon Europa which could be launched in 2016 at the earliest. </p> <p>The mission would involve a data-relay satellite orbiting Jupiter, and either a radar-mapping satellite in orbit around Europa to map the global ice cover, or a lander to make a local investigation. Europa is of interest because it is covered with white-brown ice, contorted by Jupiter's gravitational forces.</p> <p>"The magnetometer aboard the NASA Galileo Jupiter orbiter detected a magnetic field induced within Europa, and signals almost certainly indicate an interior body of liquid water," says David Southwood, ESA's director of science. Tidal heating "has almost certainly produced vast oceans of water under the ice", he adds, and scientists speculate about theoretical micro-organisms. </p> <p>Co-operation with NASA "is a really good potential solution... the Cassini-Huygens mission has whettehttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/NASAESA-to-discuss-Europa-195931/
  • NASA 'aerobot' to float on Titan

    News | 10 Aug 2004 00:00

    <p>Autonomous blimp could explore Saturn's giant moon</p> <p>NASA's Dryden research centre is hoping to follow up the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn with a mission to one of its moons, Titan, in the 2010-2015 timeframe. The mission would explore the giant moon using an autonomous blimp.</p> <p>Dryden researchers have been exploring concepts for a self-inflating "aerobot" that would self-deploy from an aeroshell atmospheric-entry vehicle 7km (4 miles) above Titan's surface. The blimp would be required to extract itself from the aeroshell, then inflate and achieve stable flight in just a few seconds.</p> <p>A half-scale aerobot demonstrator has been built and has been undergoing testing at the Edwards AFB test complex in California for the past year. The demonstrator uses a helium-filled airbag and two electric-driven propellers to manoeuvre.</p> <p>Dryden researchers are anxiously awaiting data on the composition of Titan's atmosphere from the Huygens probe when it lands on the mhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/NASA-aerobot-to-float-on-Titan-185741/
  • Software holds key to space mission success

    News | 21 Jul 2004 00:00

    <p>Space exploration missions to the deepest realms of our solar system will increasingly need sophisticated and reliable computer software if they are to succeed. While rocket power gets spacecraft into space, it's the software that really makes them earn their keep. That was the conclusion of a roundtable discussion hosted by LogicaCMG in the Space Pavilion on day one of the show.</p> <p>Powerful</p> <p>Pat Norris, business development manager for LogicaCMG says: &quot;The computer aboard the Apollo 11 mission only had a few kilobytes of memory, but today's spacecraft, like the Cassini-Huygens probe currently in orbit around Saturn, are a thousand times more powerful.</p> <p>&quot;Finding out that your software doesn't work once you are half a billion miles from your computer is not the best way forward. New software can be uploaded from earth, but if it does take an enormous ground station and a lot of patience.&quot;</p> <p>LogicaCMG says the answer lies in using specialist devhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Software-holds-key-to-space-mission-success-184737/