Top News on DHL Aviation

  • More than 150 fatalities reported in Lagos MD-83 take-off crash


    <P>Investigators are trying to establish why a Boeing MD-83 belonging to Nigerian low-cost carrier Dana Air crashed on near Lagos’s Murtala Muhammed International Airport, reportedly killing over 150 people.</P> <P>According to press reports, the MD-83 came down on 3 June shortly after departing the airport on a flight to Abuja, with 147 passengers and six crew on board. </P> <P>The twinjet – which according to Flightglobal’s ACAS database was one of five MD-83s operated by the airline – is reported to have struck power lines and then struck a building close the airport. </P> <P>There are no reports of any survivors.The weather at the time of the accident, which was at night, was reportedly relatively calm with a slight wind and good visibility.</P> <P>The Dana Air accident comes a day after a Boeing 727-200 freighter operated by Nigerian carrier Allied Air Cargo for DHL Aviation veered off the runway when landing at Accra’s Kotoka airport during a thunderstorm after a flight from Lago


  • News Listings for DHL Aviation

  • More than 150 fatalities reported in Lagos MD-83 take-off crash

    News | 03 Jun 2012 19:43 | Max Kingsley-Jones

    <P>Investigators are trying to establish why a Boeing MD-83 belonging to Nigerian low-cost carrier Dana Air crashed on near Lagos’s Murtala Muhammed International Airport, reportedly killing over 150 people.</P> <P>According to press reports, the MD-83 came down on 3 June shortly after departing the airport on a flight to Abuja, with 147 passengers and six crew on board. </P> <P>The twinjet – which according to Flightglobal’s ACAS database was one of five MD-83s operated by the airline – is reported to have struck power lines and then struck a building close the airport. </P> <P>There are no reports of any survivors.The weather at the time of the accident, which was at night, was reportedly relatively calm with a slight wind and good visibility.</P> <P>The Dana Air accident comes a day after a Boeing 727-200 freighter operated by Nigerian carrier Allied Air Cargo for DHL Aviation veered off the runway when landing at Accra’s Kotoka airport during a thunderstorm after a flight from Lagohttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/More-than-150-fatalities-reported-in-Lagos-MD-83-take-off-crash-372586/
  • Diverging paths

    News | 01 Nov 2004 00:00

    <p>Is the long-predicted strategic split finally taking place in the cargo market, with serious players forced to get more heavily into freighters while others question their future in freight?</p> <p>Ram Menen, senior vice-president cargo for Emirates Airlines, used to do a nice line at air cargo conferences on why it was not necessary for a carrier to operate freighters to be &quot;serious&quot; about air cargo. There was a good reason for this. With its all-widebody fleet and regular passenger flights, Emirates was able to field as much weekly cargo capacity on many of its routes as Boeing 747 freighter operators.</p> <p>But these days, Menen does not tout the benefits of belly cargo so loudly. Since the start of 2003, Emirates has tripled the size of its 747 freighter fleet from two to six aircraft. It now flies the aircraft to destinations as diverse as Frankfurt, Hong Kong, Johannesburg, New York and Shanghai, and looks much like a traditional freighter-operating Asian carrierhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Diverging-paths-189134/
  • Selective customers

    News | 01 Mar 2003 00:00

    <p>A few big forwarders control nearly half of the air freight business. Now they are increasingly seeking to give that business only to a few selected airlines</p> <p>One of the big differences between the passenger and cargo side of the airline business is that in the latter the customer base is much smaller and more concentrated - alarmingly so. While there are many thousands of IATA-registered freight forwarders in the world, purchasing power is concentrated in little more than a dozen top players.</p> <p>The five biggest forwarders - Danzas, Nippon Express, Exel, Panalpina and Schenker - account for over 20% of air freight revenues, estimates air freight newspaper <I>Air Cargo News</I>. The next five - Kuehne &amp; Nagel, Fritz (now part of UPS), BAXGlobal, Kintetsu and Expeditors - add another 15%. The top 17 forwarders, which includes all the remaining well-known global names, account for around 45%.</p> <p>The big are also getting bigger. A gathering trend has seen the globahttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Selective-customers-162262/
  • Cargo's online reservations

    News | 01 Jan 2001 00:00

    PETER CONWAY LONDON GF-X is now up and running, as an online trading platform for the air cargo business. But some players still seem unsure whether it is the right solution <p>After five months of testing, Global Freight Exchange (GF-X), the online trading platform for air cargo capacity, went live on 30 September, although its founders say it was taking live bookings from its 17 trial participants as far back as August. The launch was deliberately low key to avoid raising industry expectations. "It could be years before you see the full effect of GF-X," says co-founder and co-chief executive David Ravech. </p> <p>In September, the original nine airlines and eight forwarders that have been trialling the system since May were free to expand its use from the agreed test routes to their entire networks. Presumably they were also required to stump up fairly substantial subscription fees. GF-X is free at the point of use, but charges its members a monthly fee based on the size of expehttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Cargos-online-reservations-124398/
  • DHL and Boeing in talks over 40 more 757-200 freighters

    News | 09 Oct 2000 23:00

    <p>DHL Airways, the US airline arm of the express package carrier, is negotiating for Boeing to acquire and convert on its behalf more than 40 Boeing 757-200s. The deal would be almost identical to the agreement reached between DHL's European arm and Boeing for 44 converted ex-British Airways 757s. </p> <p>A senior source at DHL Airways says the carrier wants &quot;about the same number of 757s as for the European operation&quot;. The company revealed its plans for the 757 to replace the 727 at Cargo Facts' Aircraft Symposium in Miami last week. Thirty four 757s will replace nine 727-200Fs already in the fleet and 25 additional high-gross weight 727-200 Advs which DHL Airways will shortly take on short-term leases. The carrier will use 11 of the interim 727-200Advs to replace an equal number of 727-100s. </p> <p>In addition, DHL Airways plans to take at least another seven 757s to replace the seven McDonnell Douglas DC-8-73Fs that it operates on North American and transatlantic routehttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/DHL-and-Boeing-in-talks-over-40-more-757-200-freighters-121261/
  • DHL Aviation buys first ATR cargo conversion

    News | 31 Jul 2000 23:00

    <p>DHL Aviation has become the launch customer for the ATR consortium's cargo conversion of the twin turboprop. The freight company's African operation has purchased two freighter-converted ATR 42-300s. </p> <p>The aircraft are set to be delivered in September and December, but will be retrofitted with a new ATR fuselage conversion in the second quarter of next year and a large cargo door "before the end of 2001", says Antoine Bouissou, ATR vice-president for sales. </p> <p>The aircraft will be operated by its South African partner airline Rossair on the West African network (Nigeria). </p> <p>ATR has not chosen an outfitter to perform the two-programme conversions: a new, larger cargo door and modifying the current passenger cabin into an E-class cargo compartment. </p> <p>Maximum payload for the ATR cargo version will reach 5.8t for the ATR 42 and 8.25t for the ATR 72. </p> <p>ATR is optimistic about the potential cargo market for its converted freighters. "We feel there's goinghttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/DHL-Aviation-buys-first-ATR-cargo-conversion-69054/