Top News on Free Airlines

  • ​OPINION: How wi-fi policy could threaten airline brands


    In November 2014, Jeremy Gutsche, a well known Canadian entrepreneur, was on a Singapore Airlines Airbus A380 flight from London to Singapore. A busy executive, he was happy that there was wi-fi available on his flight.


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  • Open skies formally begins between the EU and Canada


    A comprehensive open aviation agreement between Canada and the European Union has taken effect today now that the sides...


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  • ​OPINION: How wi-fi policy could threaten airline brands

    News | 10 Feb 2015 14:15 | Shashank Nigam

    In November 2014, Jeremy Gutsche, a well known Canadian entrepreneur, was on a Singapore Airlines Airbus A380 flight from London to Singapore. A busy executive, he was happy that there was wi-fi available on his flight.http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/OPINION-How-wi-fi-policy-could-threaten-airline-brands-407936/
  • Open skies formally begins between the EU and Canada

    News | 17 Dec 2009 17:43 | Megan Kuhn

    A comprehensive open aviation agreement between Canada and the European Union has taken effect today now that the sides have formally signed off on the deal. It...http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Open-skies-formally-begins-between-the-EU-and-Canada-336348/
  • Accidents/incidents for 2007

    News | 07 Jan 2008 11:18 | David Learmount

    Fatal events involving illegal interference with the safety of aircraft 23 March Transaviaexport Ilyushin Il-76 (EW-78849) Mogadishu, Somalia 11 11 TO The...http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Accidentsincidents-for-2007-220648/
  • Two steps to Latin liberalisation

    News | 23 Oct 2006 23:00

    <P>In a diplomatic breakthrough involving four nations, Brazil's GOL has gained fifth freedom rights between Chile and Argentina and between Chile and Peru. Under this new authority GOL has already launched Buenos Aires-Santiago flights and plans to add Lima-Santiago service in November.</P><P>Coincidentally, four Central American nations have agreed to treat flights between them as "domestic" for purposes of assessing airport user charges. This accord between El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua, which also calls for relaxed customs and immigration controls, is seen as a step toward transforming Central America into a single aviation market.</P><P>Insiders, however, warn against leaping to conclusions about Latin America suddenly embracing liberalisation. They note Costa Rica and Panama, two key players in any move toward Central American integration, have not signed the new treaty on "domestic" flights. And the common denominator in GOL's new fifth freedoms is Chile, the rhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Two-steps-to-Latin-liberalisation-210175/
  • Solution to 'blue ice' valve testing problem

    News | 16 Jun 1999 23:00

    <p>To some people living under the approach paths of busy airports, the sky really is falling. </p> <p>'Blue ice' is the euphemistically-named substance formed when leaks from aircraft toilets freeze at altitude. As an aircraft begins its descent, lumps of ice can break off - hurtling towards earth and thus an obvious hazard. </p> <p>Already buildings have been damaged by lumps of ice weighing up to 45kg (100lb), and the US Federation Aviation Administration has issued airworthiness directives (ADs) to try to solve the problem. The ADs initially applied to the McDonnell Douglas DC-10 and Boeing 727 and, over time, have taken in other aircraft. In recent months ADs have also been issued for the Boeing 747. </p> <p>Leakage </p> <p>The regulations require that toilet-drain and flush-fill valves are regularly tested for any leakage of sewage. </p> <p>Until now, this testing has been a costly and time-consuming process. Aaxico Industries has developed the Blister (from 'Blue Ice Testerhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Solution-to-blue-ice-valve-testing-problem-52863/
  • Defending duty free

    News | 01 Mar 1999 00:00

    Duty free sales within Europe appear to have won a reprieve. But how hard will airlines be hit if duty free is eventually abolished? <p>To bureaucrats, the abolition of duty free must have looked a simple matter when it was mooted. The European Union (EU) decided in 1991 to scrap duty free sales for travellers within the region as part of taxation and excise measures to make the single market a reality. It was supposed to happen in tandem with the harmonisation of taxes in the EU - but that remains a distant prospect. </p> <p>The abolition of duty free may have been proposed in 1991, but the industry has made little headway towards preparing for its departure. No viable alternative has been set up to replace duty free. "There is a realisation that if we abolish duty free, then we will leave an absolute shambles in its place. Across the EU people are crying 'stop doing this so hastily'," says Bob Parker-Eaton, deputy managing director of charter airline Britannia and vice chairman ohttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Defending-duty-free-48774/