Top News on Grumman A-6 Intruder

  • Lockheed unveils more information on UCLASS programme


    Lockheed Martin has revealing additional details about its submission for the US Navy's UCLASS requirement ...


  • Other News for Grumman A-6 Intruder

  • Boeing and General Dynamics to appeal against ruling in A-12 case


    Boeing and General Dynamics are to appeal the latest ruling in the long-running lawsuit over the US Navy’s 1991...


  • News Listings for Grumman A-6 Intruder

  • ANALYSIS: How the 777 pushed Boeing forward

    News | 15 Apr 2014 11:41 | Stephen Trimble

    No aircraft roll-out ceremony is complete without a video montage, and the unveiling of the Boeing 777 on 9 April 1994 before 100,000 onlookers was no exception. As the Disney-style production opened on a screen wide enough to fill the aircraft assembly bay, an unseen narrator asked three questions:http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/ANALYSIS-How-the-777-pushed-Boeing-forward-398233/
  • Lockheed unveils more information on UCLASS programme

    News | 12 Apr 2013 03:07 | Dave Majumdar

    Lockheed Martin has revealing additional details about its submission for the US Navy's UCLASS requirement ...http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Lockheed-unveils-more-information-on-UCLASS-programme-384589/
  • Boeing and General Dynamics to appeal against ruling in A-12 case

    News | 08 May 2007 10:04 | Graham Warwick

    Boeing and General Dynamics are to appeal the latest ruling in the long-running lawsuit over the US Navy’s 1991 termination of the contract for the A-12 stealth attack aircraft.http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Boeing-and-General-Dynamics-to-appeal-against-ruling-in-A-12-case-213703/
  • Boeing/GD fight A-12 money grab

    News | 10 Dec 2002 00:00

    GRAHAM WARWICK / WASHINGTON DC Manufacturers ask federal judge to delay US Navy's debt collection attempts as attack aircraft saga enters new phase <p>Boeing and General Dynamics (GD) are moving to delay an attempt by the US Department of Defense (DoD) to recover $2.3 billion from the failed A-12 attack aircraft programme. Last week, the DoD told the companies it will begin collecting the debt by deducting money from payments on various existing contracts, including Boeing's F/A-18E/F Super Hornet and C-17 transport, and GD's Seawolf-class attack submarines.</p> <p>A federal judge has been asked to block the collection effort, arguing the DoD should wait for a court hearing due to start on 9 January. The manufacturers' move is the latest in the long-running legal battle over the A-12 cancellation in 1991. In August last year, the US Court of Federal Claims ruled that the US Navy, which had ordered the stealthy A-12 as a replacement for its Grumman A-6 Intruder attack aircraft, was jhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/BoeingGD-fight-A-12-money-grab-158935/
  • Pentagon threatens to stop payment in A-12 row

    News | 07 Oct 2002 23:00

    <p>ALEXANDER CAMPBELL / LONDON</p> <p>Department of Defense presses on with recovery action as manufacturers appeal</p> <p>The US Department of Defense is threatening to cut off payments to Boeing and General Dynamics after they refused last week to repay $2.3 billion owed from the cancelled A-12 Avenger programme. </p> <p>The government gave the two contractors until 30 September to repay $1.15 billion each, but both refused. The Pentagon says that, while &quot;the optimal way is for them to pay us in cash...if the companies do not pay, we can arrange a set-off deal against existing contracts&quot;. This would see payments to the two companies for current programmes being suspended.</p> <p>Negotiations on the method of payment continue, with the Pentagon understood to have rejected an offer of payment in kind, in free engineering improvements and extra aircraft on existing contracts.</p> <p>The US Court of Federal Claims ruled last year that the US Navy, which originally orderedhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Pentagon-threatens-to-stop-payment-in-A-12-row-155971/
  • Pitching forward

    News | 19 Feb 1997 00:00

    <p>A McDonnell Douglas (MDC) F-18E/F Super Hornet has undergone initial carrier-qualification tests on the nuclear-powered USS John Stennis, the US Navy's latest aircraft carrier. This significant milestone has been achieved in the wake of a grounding caused by an engine problem, and with political rough seas and a tactical-aircraft budget showdown on the horizon. </p> <p>The F-18E/F programme suffered a month's interruption after an incident in November 1996 in which a General Electric F414 engine suffered a compressor stall during supersonic flight-testing. The pilot was able to retard the powerplant to idle and return to base. </p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>BACK IN THE AIR </p> <p>Flight-testing resumed after GE developed a cure, and the overall schedule was unaffected because MDC completed planned wing modifications during the aircraft's grounding. GE fixed the two engines installed in test aircraft F-1, one of a pair of two-seat F-18Fs in the flight-test programme. Two spare engines abhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Pitching-forward-1737/