Top News on H-5

  • Joint response: World Air Forces Directory introduction


    Air arms around the world reacted to multiple challenges during 2011, despite fleet and budget cuts. We list the current inventories and procurement plans of 160 nations.


  • Other News for H-5

  • Joint response: World Air Forces Directory introduction


    Air arms around the world reacted to multiple challenges during 2011, despite fleet and budget cuts. We list the...


  • High hopes at NASA as Mars orbiter begins orbital insertion today


    <P><BR>NASA is eagerly watching the final stages of the approach towards Mars's atmosphere of the&nbsp;latest...


  • News Listings for H-5

  • Fuel injection, controls boost Rotax engine efficiency in LSA market

    News | 21 Mar 2012 15:00 | John Croft

    Rotax says the new 912iS fuel-injected 100hp (75kW) engine it plans to begin delivering for light sport aircraft (LSA) in May will have 21% better fuel efficiency than the carburetted 912S and 30-70% better than traditional four-cylinder, four-stroke piston engines in the LSA sector.http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Fuel-injection-controls-boost-Rotax-engine-efficiency-in-LSA-market-369643/
  • Joint response: World Air Forces Directory introduction

    News | 14 Dec 2011 17:10 | Craig Hoyle

    Air arms around the world reacted to multiple challenges during 2011, despite fleet and budget cuts. We list the current inventories and procurement plans of 160 nations.http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Joint-response-World-Air-Forces-Directory-introduction-366005/
  • Defence in brief: 28 November 2006

    News | 28 Nov 2006 00:00

    <P><STRONG>Armed MALE</STRONG></P> <P>The Canadian defence force plans to arm its proposed medium altitude, long endurance (MALE) unmanned air vehicle systems. If funding is granted, a competition for up to nine MALE systems will be launched with a contract signature expected by mid-2007, says Canadian air force project director Lt Col Wade Williams. The joint UAV surveillance targeting acquisition system project is budgeted to cost C$500 million ($446 million).</P> <P><STRONG>Albanian scrap</STRONG></P> <P>Albania is to scrap 36 obsolete aircraft belonging to the country's air force and focus on modernising its helicopter inventory, say local media reports. The aircraft to be dismantled include eight Mikoyan MiG-15UTI Midget two-seat trainers, six Chengdu FT-5 trainers, 13 Nanchang CJ-6 propeller-driven trainers, eight Nanchang Y-5 utility aircraft and a Harbin H-5 target towing aircraft.</P> <P><STRONG>Skylite B show</STRONG></P> <P>Rafael's SkyLite B mini unmanned air vehicle whttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Defence-in-brief-28-November-2006-210803/
  • High hopes at NASA as Mars orbiter begins orbital insertion today

    News | 09 Mar 2006 10:45

    <P><BR>NASA is eagerly watching the final stages of the approach towards Mars's atmosphere of the&nbsp;latest spacecraft to venture towards the Red Planet, hoping to avoid a further costly loss of vehicle.<BR><BR>The agency's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is expected later today to start insertion manouevres that should see it orbiting Mars by the end of the year. NASA only has a 65% success rate in its&nbsp;space probes orbiting the planet, and&nbsp;around 80% in landing spacecrafts on its surface. For this reason, anticipation has mounted in the mission's Californian headquarters.<BR><BR>At 21:24 GMT tomorrow NASA’s MRO will fire its main thrusters for 27min to reduce its velocity of 18,000km/h (5,000m/s, 985,000ft/min) by 20% to enable Mars’s gravity to capture it and pull it into a very elongated elliptical orbit. <BR><BR>After its seven month cruise, over the next six months more than 500 aerobraking manoeuvres, dips into the atmosphere, will gradually shrink the probe's orbithttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/High-hopes-at-NASA-as-Mars-orbiter-begins-orbital-insertion-today-205362/
  • The missiles on the market

    News | 10 Dec 2002 00:00

    <p>There are essentially two generations of MANPADs. The first generation, which includes the SA-7, has uncooled seekers with lead sulphide detectors operating in the 1-3µm near-infrared band, which can only see hot engine parts. The engagement geometry is highly constrained: the missile has to be launched from the rear of the aircraft or the seeker will not see the hot tailpipe.</p> <p>First-generation IR-guided missiles can be defeated in two ways: flares and jammers. The uncooled sensor cannot tell the difference between the target and a flare and can be spoofed by a waveform jammer that generates a fluctuating infrared signal - "think of a fan blade in front of a hot brick", says David Schmieder, senior research engineer at Georgia Tech Research Institute. The jammer has to have a radiant intensity greater than that of the engine.</p> <p>The second generation, which includes Raytheon's Stinger, has cooled seekers with indium antimonide detectors operating in the 3-5µm mid-infrarehttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/The-missiles-on-the-market-158979/
  • Reality bites

    News | 15 Feb 2000 00:00

    Opportunities are looming large, but Asia's aerospace industry is in poor shape <p>Chris Jasper/LONDON</p> <p><img src='../Assets/GetAsset.aspx?ItemID=3950' /></p> <p>Asia's battered aerospace sector is finally getting to grips with the new realities thrust upon it by the region's patchwork economic collapse of a few years ago - although it has taken its time. </p> <p>Before currencies nose-dived in 1997, Asia had been gearing up for a major expansion of its aerospace manufacturing capabilities as it sought to capitalise on an anticipated explosion in its own air transport market. </p> <p>Although that explosion has really only been delayed, the effects of that delay have been devastating for the industry. Flagship projects such as China's TrunkLiner and AE31X have been killed off. Active programmes, including Indonesia's N250, have been strangled by a lack of cash. Ambitious schemes to challenge the West's market leadership - such as Japan's YS-X regional jet family - have diedhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Reality-bites-61907/