Top News on Hughes 500

  • Ireland wants EASA to tighten business aviation safety rules


    <P>The European Aviation Safety Agency has been urged to examine corporate aviation on the continent. The Irish Air Accident Investigation Unit (AAIU) says EASA should "review the situation with regard to the regulation of corporate aviation activity in Europe as a matter of urgency".</P> <P>But the European Business Aircraft Association (EBAA) counters that parts of the charter sector of the general aviation industry, not the corporate sector, is at issue, and the situation cited by the AAIU reflects a need for enforcement of existing regulations rather than the creation of more rules.</P> <P>The AAIU made its recommendation as a result of <A href="http://www.aaiu.ie/AAIUviewitem.asp?id=10780&amp;lang=ENG&amp;loc=1652">an investigation into a non-fatal accident involving a Schweizer 300CBi light piston helicopter in September 2007</A>, but this is not the first time Ireland has raised the issue of extending Joint Aviation Regulations as they apply to business aviation.</P> <P>In t


  • Other News for Hughes 500

  • Ireland wants EASA to tighten business aviation safety rules


    <P>The European Aviation Safety Agency has been urged to examine corporate aviation on the continent. The Irish Air...


  • News Listings for Hughes 500

  • Australia mulls over new firefighting capabilities

    News | 22 Aug 2009 11:00 | Emma Kelly

    Australia is sticking with tried and tested aerial strategies as it enters this year's fire season, but new capabilities are on the horizonhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Australia-mulls-over-new-firefighting-capabilities-331306/
  • Ireland wants EASA to tighten business aviation safety rules

    News | 29 Jul 2008 12:00 | David Learmount

    <P>The European Aviation Safety Agency has been urged to examine corporate aviation on the continent. The Irish Air Accident Investigation Unit (AAIU) says EASA should "review the situation with regard to the regulation of corporate aviation activity in Europe as a matter of urgency".</P> <P>But the European Business Aircraft Association (EBAA) counters that parts of the charter sector of the general aviation industry, not the corporate sector, is at issue, and the situation cited by the AAIU reflects a need for enforcement of existing regulations rather than the creation of more rules.</P> <P>The AAIU made its recommendation as a result of <A href="http://www.aaiu.ie/AAIUviewitem.asp?id=10780&amp;lang=ENG&amp;loc=1652">an investigation into a non-fatal accident involving a Schweizer 300CBi light piston helicopter in September 2007</A>, but this is not the first time Ireland has raised the issue of extending Joint Aviation Regulations as they apply to business aviation.</P> <P>In thttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Ireland-wants-EASA-to-tighten-business-aviation-safety-rules-226173/
  • Refining the learning curve

    News | 06 Sep 2004 23:00

    <p>The Mojave, California-based National Test Pilots School is the largest civilian organisation of its type in the world, offering up to 32 unique courses for pilots and flight-test engineers ranging from one-week introductory subset modules to a one-year course on performance and flying qualities, as well as systems.</p> <p>Established in 1981, the school is enjoying the fruits of a major course restructuring exercise in 1999, which has boosted student intake over the past four years, says NTPS deputy director Greg Lewis. </p> <p>The biggest changes were made to the &quot;Professional Course&quot;, which was divided into two main phases instead of three, thereby allowing more time to be given to systems training. This reflected a growing need for systems flight-test expertise fostered by the increasing number of civil and military upgrade programmes and almost immediately resulted in a doubling of enrollment in the Professional Course.</p> <p>Although the full-year course is stillhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Refining-the-learning-curve-187170/
  • Agile force

    News | 16 Mar 2004 00:00

    <p>US Army aviation is preparing for a sweeping restructuring that rivals in scope the introduction of the air mobility concept in 1960</p> <p>The US Army's aviation shake-up comes four-and-a-half years after it began overhauling its organisation and equipment used for land warfare, a time gap that army leaders are now rushing to close. Fundamentally, army aviation has chosen to shift its strategic emphasis to function less as a standalone attack force and more as a supporting adjunct to the infantry and armoured units on the ground. Thus, the stand-off role of the now-terminated Boeing/Sikorsky RAH-66 Comanche is giving way to a more agile force that is able to provide direct support to ground forces in almost any situation. </p> <p>According to Gen Richard Cody, the army's deputy chief of staff for operations, what is changing is "the army's propensity to fight more joint operations with helicopters more in the close fight supporting our ground manoeuvre forces for killing, reconnahttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Agile-force-178948/
  • China uses Zhuhai air show to unveil plethora of unmanned air vehicles

    News | 21 Nov 2000 00:00

    <p>China is driving forward its unmanned air vehicle (UAV) developments and has revealed plans for unmanned combat air vehicles (UCAVs). </p> <p>At the Zhuhai air show earlier this month, Guizhou Aircraft unveilled its stealthy WZ-2000 multi-role surveillance UAV. While stressing that the WZ-2000 is only a concept, Guizhou says the twin-jet delta platform UAV is 4.5m (15ft) long and has a 3m span. It will carry 20-55kg (45-120lb) payloads at 460kt (850km/h). </p> <p>Guizhou says the UAV's size and payload - which will include future radar systems - could be configured to meet customer needs. </p> <p>The largest UAV revealed at Zhuhai was a variant of the Chang Hong (a copy of the US Ryan Firebee), said to have been in production for two years. This variant has a new inertial navigation system with embedded GPS satellite positioning and can fly at 57,500ft (17,500m) for 2,500km (1,350nm). </p> <p>The Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics (BUAA) and the Nanjing Universithttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/China-uses-Zhuhai-air-show-to-unveil-plethora-of-unmanned-air-vehicles-123200/
  • World Air Forces listing A-B

    News | 24 Nov 1999 00:00

    <p>AFGHANISTAN</p> <p>Afghanistan has been wracked by war for decades. The Islamic Taliban controls about two-thirds of the land-locked, mountainous country. Areas in the north are held by an alliance led by General Ahmad Shah Masoud. Fierce fighting frequently breaks out in and around Kabul, in the north-eastern provinces of Takhar, Kunduz and Baghlan and in the north-western provinces of Faryab and Badghis. Although 10-12 groups exist, only the Taliban and Masoud's forces lay claim to any air power. The Taliban claims to have captured Masoud's five L-39s, and appears to operate them with its 20-odd MiG-21s and Su-20/22s. Both Soviet-era types are reportedly in Masoud's service as well. Both sides have helicopters, mainly Mi-8/17s, but also Mi-24/25/35 Hinds. Taliban forces also have access to An-24 transports. Casualties continue to be high due to poor access to spares - although Pakistan is believed to aid the Taliban - and a plentiful supply of MANPADS such as SA-7 Grail (Strela 2http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/World-Air-Forces-listing-A-B-58978/