News Listings for Invercargill

  • Air New Zealand ATR 72-500 lands safely with one engine

    News | 19 Oct 2012 05:07 | Greg Waldron

    <p>An Air New Zealand ATR 72-500 aircraft landed safely at Invercargill airport on Friday, 19 October 2012, after the crew shut down one of its engines during...http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Air-New-Zealand-ATR-72-500-lands-safely-with-one-engine-377838/
  • ANZ to resume some NZ flights today

    News | 16 Jun 2011 03:12 | Ghim-Lay Yeo

    <p>Air New Zealand (ANZ) plans to resume operations in the lower South Island this afternoon, as ash plumes from a volcano eruption in Chile continue to affect...http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/ANZ-to-resume-some-NZ-flights-today-358072/
  • NZ air ambulances due for surgery

    News | 01 Feb 2005 00:00

    <p>New Zealand has proposed centralising its emergency air ambulance service in a move that would see the number of bases and helicopters used reduced. The draft national air ambulance strategy has received a mixed response, welcomed by some, while others expressed concerns that parts of the country will not be adequately served.</p> <p>New Zealand has 23 fixed-wing and 27 rotary-wing aircraft operated by 18 companies providing services in 18 regions. The proposed strategy, released for public comment by the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC), has been developed by an intra-agency steering group, including the Ministry of Health, Ambulance New Zealand and the air rescue/air ambulance division of the Aviation Industry Association. The strategy covers the long-term future for air ambulances and is in response to the growing numbers of air ambulances in operation, low use and rising costs. Existing air ambulance contracts awarded by the ACC run to October 2006. </p> <p>The strategyhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/NZ-air-ambulances-due-for-surgery-193308/
  • Origin struggles to find its niche

    News | 31 Aug 2004 23:00

    <p>New Zealand's second carrier, Origin Pacific, faces hard decisions about what kind of airline it should be as it tries to resolve its future.</p> <p>Since April, when Qantas Airways dropped a codeshare deal on domestic New Zealand routes, Origin has faced numerous woes. Traffic fell unexpectedly and it was forced into expensive links with global distribution systems to regain the overseas visibility it lost when Qantas dropped the codeshare. Origin scrambled to forge seven interline deals with cruise lines and other foreign airlines to compensate for the lost Qantas feed.</p> <p>Despite cutbacks, in May Origin teetered near bankruptcy until creditors agreed to a NZ$11.8 million ($7.6 million) rescue. With new owners now holding half its shares, the carrier is taking a hard look at its options. It needs to keep the domestic feed generated by new interline agreements, but also needs to cut costs and so far that has been top priority.</p> <p>Feed traffic has suffered as Origin cut fhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Origin-struggles-to-find-its-niche-186724/
  • Cooking up business

    News | 07 Oct 1997 23:00

    The move to ATR 72s has so far been successful for Mount Cook Airline's crews and passengers <p>Paul Phelan/CAIRNS </p> <p>A fleet of five to six Boeing 737-400s or Airbus A320s, and 13-14 Aero International (Regional) (AI(R)) ATR 72s, calculates one air-transport analyst, would far better fit Air New Zealand's (ANZ) entire domestic operation and its low-capacity trans-Tasman capacity demands than do the existing combined fleets of ANZ Domestic and ANZ subsidiary Mount Cook Airline. </p> <p>In that scenario, ANZ-owned Air Nelson and Eagle Airways would continue to provide local feeder services and low-capacity hub bypass, while Mount Cook Airline would take up extra domestic routes, adding a further six or seven ATR 72s to the seven it now operates. </p> <p>ANZ's fleet of 11 ageing 737-200s would be replaced with a smaller number of Airbus or Boeing aircraft in the 140-seat range for trunk domestic services, and on secondary New Zealand-Australia routes which cannot support widebohttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Cooking-up-business-24852/
  • Strong market

    News | 12 Feb 1997 00:00

    <p>From November 1996, any airline with over 50% Australian and/or New Zealand ownership has been allowed to fly freely between the two countries or within them, subject only to border restrictions. That this new freedom has not precipitated a rash of low-cost start-up carriers and a scramble for new routes says more about the market strength of the established trans-Tasman carriers, than it says about the new opportunities the single aviation market (SAM) has put in place. </p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Large market </p> <p>Two months before the SAM was opened up, the new trans-Tasman aviation environment had already seen the demise of New Zealand start-up carrier Kiwi Travel. Kiwi had identified a surprisingly large market for low-cost travel bypassing Auckland, operating from Hamilton, the home of New Zealand's fourth-largest urban population and a major regional population centre, and from Invercargill in the South Island, to Brisbane, Perth (Western Australia), and Sydney. The fledglinghttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Strong-market-1649/