Top News on Jonkoping

  • Picture: Icelandair Cargo to operate Airbus A330 freighters


    <P><A href="http://www.icelandaircargo.com/AboutIcelandairCargo/Index.cfm">Icelandair Cargo</A> is aiming to reduce its dependency on its home market following its agreement to acquire <A href="http://www.airbus.com/en/aircraftfamilies/a330a340/a330-200f/">Airbus A330-200 freighters</A>.</P> <P>The Icelandair Group’s freight division is to take four A330Fs through an arrangement with Avion Aircraft Trading, which has just firmed an agreement with Airbus to acquire eight of the type.</P> <P>Icelandair Cargo will lease two of them directly from Avion. But Icelandair Group’s leasing subsidiary, Icelease, is to buy two of the jets and lease them back to Icelandair Cargo.</P> <P>Two of the A330Fs will be delivered in spring 2010 and the other pair in 2011.</P> <P><IMG style="WIDTH: 445px; HEIGHT: 335px" alt="" src="../assets/getAsset.aspx?ItemID=17856" border=0></P> <P>Icelandair Cargo, which presently operates five Boeing 757-200 freighters, is to use the A330Fs to develop long-haul fligh


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  • Saab to build Talarion computers

    News | 22 Sep 2011 20:24 | Zach Rosenberg

    Cassidian has awarded Saab the job of building crucial avionics equipment for its Talarion unmanned air vehicle ...http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Saab-to-build-Talarion-computers-362459/
  • Picture: Icelandair Cargo to operate Airbus A330 freighters

    News | 25 May 2007 08:51 | David Kaminski-Morrow

    <P><A href="http://www.icelandaircargo.com/AboutIcelandairCargo/Index.cfm">Icelandair Cargo</A> is aiming to reduce its dependency on its home market following its agreement to acquire <A href="http://www.airbus.com/en/aircraftfamilies/a330a340/a330-200f/">Airbus A330-200 freighters</A>.</P> <P>The Icelandair Group’s freight division is to take four A330Fs through an arrangement with Avion Aircraft Trading, which has just firmed an agreement with Airbus to acquire eight of the type.</P> <P>Icelandair Cargo will lease two of them directly from Avion. But Icelandair Group’s leasing subsidiary, Icelease, is to buy two of the jets and lease them back to Icelandair Cargo.</P> <P>Two of the A330Fs will be delivered in spring 2010 and the other pair in 2011.</P> <P><IMG style="WIDTH: 445px; HEIGHT: 335px" alt="" src="../assets/getAsset.aspx?ItemID=17856" border=0></P> <P>Icelandair Cargo, which presently operates five Boeing 757-200 freighters, is to use the A330Fs to develop long-haul flighhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Picture-Icelandair-Cargo-to-operate-Airbus-A330-freighters-214229/
  • SAS trims short-haul network in bid to stave off low-cost competition

    News | 01 May 2002 00:00

    <p>SAS is overhauling its short-haul network in a bid to cut costs and tackle the problem of how to compete with the no frills sector.</p> <p>The carrier is axing seven routes completely for this year's winter season, and transferring another six to regional affiliates. The airline says the measures will go at least half way towards reducing annual costs by SKr4 billion ($390 million). </p> <p>SAS is just one of a number of European flag carriers struggling with the threat of low-cost rivals. "This is an illustrative story for the sector," says Jonathan Wober, financial analyst at Deutsche Bank. "British Airways is struggling with the same issue, and other carriers will shortly have the same problem."</p> <p>SAS is improving fleet productivity by fire-walling its three main bases - going back and forth on one route rather than operating more complex triangular routings. It is also starting flights earlier in the morning at its Copenhagen and Stockholm hubs and minimising turnaroundhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/SAS-trims-short-haul-network-in-bid-to-stave-off-low-cost-competition-147174/
  • SAS slashes lossmaking services

    News | 23 Apr 2002 00:00

    <p>TOM GILL / LONDON</p> <p>Scandinavian Airlines (SAS) has unveiled a major reorganisation of European operations that will see it axing loss-making routes in Scandinavia and boosting intra-European business services. </p> <p>The move, aimed at returning the carrier to profitability, will involve SAS cutting 13 routes and transferring six of them to lower-cost subsidiaries and partners, and disposing of or redeploying up to 20 aircraft. </p> <p>In October, SAS will stop flying from Copenhagen to Jonkoping, Norrkoping and Vasteras in Sweden and Wroclaw in Poland, and will cut routes from Stockholm to Kristianstad and Skelleftea in Sweden. Next April, it will drop flights from Copenhagen to Sondre Stromfjord in Greenland. From October, its Norwegian regional Wideroe will gradually take over the northern Norway Norlink network operated by SAS Commuter. </p> <p>SAS-owned Boeing 737 operator Braathens will take over the Oslo-Tromso-Kirkenes route which SAS currently flies with Boeinghttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/SAS-slashes-lossmaking-services-146655/
  • Talk this way

    News | 07 Feb 1996 00:00

    <p>A Swedish-led technology could provide a key element of the Future Air Navigation System. </p> <p>Kieran Daly/LONDON </p> <p>THE GLOBAL-NAVIGATION satellite-system-synchronised, self-organising, time-division, multiple-access (STDMA) data- link really needs a much better name. It is one thing for the dedicated souls serving on the International Civil Aviation Organisation's (ICAO) technical committees to cope with this sort of linguistic horror, but there is now good reason to think that a much wider aviation community will have to incorporate "STDMA" into its vocabulary. Indeed, it may become one of the most important technical elements of the Future Air Navigation System (FANS). </p> <p>In the rarefied world of the FANS planners, data-links are the number one technical concern. Data-linking pervades the entire philosophy behind the FANS and, even now, new applications for it are emerging: as a replacement for voice communications; to pass position reports via satellites; to cohttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Talk-this-way-19504/
  • 'Financial irregularities' found at Transwede

    News | 31 Jan 1996 00:00

    <p>SWEDISH STATE prosecutor Berndt Berger has found "gross irregularities" in the finances of Sweden's Transwede Airways. Investigations into the airline were started after the present owners raised the alarm over the whereabouts of nearly krona 180 million ($26 million). </p> <p>Two former presidents, Lars-Olof Svenheim and Thomas Johansson, have been questioned, but have denied any involvement. </p> <p>It is suspected that around $20 million found its way into accounts or businesses in the Cayman Islands and Panama in the aftermath of a series of aircraft purchases in 1987. The investigation is focusing on the acquisition of a new $26.5 million McDonnell Douglas MD-83 for which Transwede may have paid twice, with monthly payments of $30,000 sent to a Cayman Islands account. </p> <p>Transwede, now owned by KF, Nordic Capital and Electra Investments, provides scheduled domestic services from Stockholm Arlanda Airport to Jonkoping, Halmstad, Lulea, Sundsvall and Umea with Fokker 100shttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Financial-irregularities-found-at-Transwede-19417/