Top News on Le Mans

  • Lola's F1 history hides a kink for aerospace


    Motorsport fans love to love Lola. But while the company is famed for engineering some for F1's frontrunners it has diversified with business in aerospace, defence, communications and automotive.


  • Other News for Le Mans

  • Structural batteries 'could revolutionise electric design'


    BAE Systems is promising a revolution in battery-powered unmanned aircraft and other devices by building power storage...


  • News Listings for Le Mans

  • Structural batteries 'could revolutionise electric design'

    News | 01 Mar 2012 11:00 | Dan Thisdell

    BAE Systems is promising a revolution in battery-powered unmanned aircraft and other devices by building power storage directly into structural composite materials.http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Structural-batteries-could-revolutionise-electric-design-368965/
  • Lola's F1 history hides a kink for aerospace

    News | 19 Jul 2011 09:00 | Dan Thisdell

    Motorsport fans love to love Lola. But while the company is famed for engineering some for F1's frontrunners it has diversified with business in aerospace, defence, communications and automotive.http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Lolas-F1-history-hides-a-kink-for-aerospace-359421/
  • Flight 100 - History 1909-1918

    News | 02 Jan 2009 00:01 | Philip Jarrett

    Britsh aviation made a slow start, but within the decade the country was making aircraft and the RAF had formedhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Flight-100-History-1909-1918-320372/
  • Formula for success

    News | 14 Jun 2004 23:00

    <p>The long-standing links between motorsport and aerospace will be celebrated at Farnborough with a dedicated pavilion to promote cross-fertilisation between the two industries.</p> <p>The move is the first step of a UK government-funded &quot;Motorsport to Aerospace&quot; technology transfer venture. The &quot;Motorsport Valley Pavilion&quot; is designed to allow motorsport companies to present their products and services to aerospace buyers. It is the first time that non-aerospace businesses have exhibited at the show.</p> <p>The Government Motorsport Unit has been created by the UK Department of Trade and Industry to allocate £16 million ($29.3 million) over a five-year period to develop UK motorsport.</p> <p>The UK's Motorsport Industry Association (MIA) has implemented the programme, with support from the Society of British Aerospace Companies. The MIA says that future elements will include provision of consultancy support services, workshops, and a trade mission to next year'http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Formula-for-success-182958/
  • A Douglas Jet?

    News | 17 Jun 2002 23:00

    <p>Reports from America indicate that the Douglas Corporation will soon announce its design for a jet transport, presumably to be designated DC-8. Of the rumoured U.S. jetliner projects, the Douglas is is possibly nearest to construction, and the beginning of work on the prototype may coincide with the announcement of its existence. At a reported all-up weight of 145,000lb, the aircraft should have a capacity for 85-90 passengers. Its power-units - to be installed in &quot;pods&quot; and not buried in the wings - are likely to be four axial-flow turbojets of some 10,000lb thrust per unit; the choice of power-plant probably lies between the Pratt and Whitney J-57 and the Wright-built Sapphire. Wings will be swept back 35°, and a cruising speed of over 500 m.p.h is specified.</p> <p>Skyrocket's 79,000ft </p> <p>Late last summer the United States Navy officially announced in New York that a Douglas Skyrocket research aircraft had exceeded the world's absolute altitude record of 72,394fthttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/A-Douglas-Jet-149690/
  • Airways railroaded

    News | 14 Aug 2000 23:00

    Air vs Rail: Airports and airlines take a new train of thought on partnerships for the 21st century <p>DeeDee Doke/LONDON Julian Moxon/PARIS </p> <p>As growing numbers of aircraft crowd European skies, more and more airline and airport operators are turning their attention to a ground force to relieve the congestion. </p> <p>Across Europe, the newest solutions to moving passengers quickly between major hubs and smaller industrial centres involve rail - air travel's older transport relation - much to the chagrin of regional airlines. </p> <p>From France to Sweden, the air transport industry major league's pioneering spirit in this effort is driven more by need than by a desire to share its influence and ever-increasing customer base. </p> <p>"It's not economical to fly a 300km (162 nm) sector. You pay so much in landing fees," says Andrew Sharp, director general of the Heathrow-based International Air Rail Organisation (IARO). </p> <p>The organisation's members include airports,http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Airways-railroaded-69565/