Top News on Lockheed C-141 Starlifter

  • OSHKOSH: Betsy’s Biscuit Bomber – one veteran’s march towards Oshkosh


    A mass of DC-3s will be seen over Wisconsin this month - including Betsy's Biscuit Bomber from the Estrella Warbirds Museum


  • Other News for Lockheed C-141 Starlifter

  • OSHKOSH: Betsy’s Biscuit Bomber – one veteran’s march towards Oshkosh


    A mass of DC-3s will be seen over Wisconsin this month - including Betsy's Biscuit Bomber from the Estrella Warbirds...


  • News Listings for Lockheed C-141 Starlifter

  • OSHKOSH: Betsy’s Biscuit Bomber – one veteran’s march towards Oshkosh

    News | 19 Jul 2010 23:00 | Mike Gerzanics

    A mass of DC-3s will be seen over Wisconsin this month - including Betsy's Biscuit Bomber from the Estrella Warbirds Museumhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/OSHKOSH-Betsys-Biscuit-Bomber-one-veterans-march-towards-Oshkosh-344542/
  • Geriatric ward

    News | 12 Dec 2000 00:00

    <p>Sustainment has become a major issue because military aircraft are remaining in service longer - many are likely to serve for more than 50 years</p> <p>Stewart Penney/WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB </p> <p>Retaining elderly military aircraft in service is a worldwide issue as air forces shift away from new aircraft programmes and place increasing emphasis on through-life upgrades. Long term work at the US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) will apply science and technology along with improved business practices to sustain the USAF's fleet. Over 75% of the USAF's aircraft are more than 25 years old, and many are expected to be in service more than 50 years. </p> <p><img src='../Assets/GetAsset.aspx?ItemID=4959' /></p> <p>"We have turned around from being reactive to proactive, but it's not easy to apply," says Mike Zeigler, ageing aircraft structures leader within the AFRL's air vehicles directorate. </p> <p>The AFRL's sustainment programmes can be broadly split into two areas - ageinghttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Geriatric-ward-123640/
  • Lucas launches 'power by wire' work

    News | 04 Aug 1998 23:00

    <p>Graham Warwick/WASHINGTON DC</p> <p>Lucas Aerospace has launched development of an electric actuation system suitable for combat aircraft and large commercial transports, following successful completion of a 1,000h in-service test of "power by wire" on a US Air Force Lockheed C-141 Starlifter transport. </p> <p>The so-called Electric Starlifter has Lucas-developed integrated actuation packages (IAPs) replacing the conventional hydraulic actuators on the ailerons. Each dual-channel IAP houses two electric-motor-driven hydraulic pumps which move the actuator. </p> <p>The Electric Starlifter uses 7kW (9hp)IAPs. Steve Croke, director of technology at Lucas Aerospace Utica, says the company has begun development of a 20-30kWIAP aimed at the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and other applications requiring more power. The larger actuator will be demonstrated early in 1999, he says. </p> <p>The 1,000h in-service test demonstrated the reliability and maintainability of the IAP, Croke says, wihttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Lucas-launches-power-by-wire-work-40356/
  • Berlin airlift impasse

    News | 12 May 1998 23:00

    <p><img src='../Assets/GetAsset.aspx?ItemID=868' /></p> <p>Douglas Barrie/LONDON</p> <p>The sight of an airlifter over Berlin used to be welcome. In the case of the Antonov An-70, making its Western show debut, there will be those among the crowd who wish it had remained in Ukraine. </p> <p>The An-70 is being championed by none other than Volker R&uuml;he,Germany's defence minister, to meet Europe's longstanding plan to modernise its air forces' tactical airlifter capabilities.The Ukrainian aircraft is viewed by many, however, as an interloper in addressing the European Staff Requirement (ESR). Not least of all by those within Airbus Military Company (AMC), also in attendance at the show, which is working to meet the ESR with the Future Large Aircraft (FLA). </p> <p>Germany was the first to sign the ESR in 1996, some 14 years after the initial multi-Future International Military Airlifter (FIMA) was launched to address the programme. The AMC FLA project grew from the governmental phttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Berlin-airlift-impasse-37049/
  • Military-transport losses raise African mid-air collision fears

    News | 23 Sep 1997 23:00

    <p>David Learmount/London </p> <p>A mid-air collision in African airspace was predictable, says the International Federation of Airline Pilots Associations (IFALPA), following the simultaneous disappearance of German and US military transport aircraft off Namibia on 13 September. IFALPA warned in 1996 that African air traffic control (ATC) suffers from inadequacies (Flight International, 27 November-3 December 1996). </p> <p>A collision has been accepted by Namibia's search-and-rescue (SAR) services as the only reasonable explanation from the emerging evidence. Germany confirms that the floating wreckage-fields for the two aircraft overlap. </p> <p>The wreckage is about 100km (55nm) off northern Namibia. A week after the event, only one body had been recovered from the sea. The SAR centre gives the wreckage position as 18degrees30`S/11degrees03`E, close to the waypoint at 18¹S/10¹E for which the US Air Force Lockheed C-141 Starlifter was heading, having taken off from Windhoek, Namihttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Military-transport-losses-raise-African-mid-air-collision-fears-22796/
  • Back to basics

    News | 23 Sep 1997 23:00

    <p>Airline pilots have, for years, been warning over the growing threat of a mid-air collision in African airspace. On 13 September they appear, unfortunately, to have been proved right, with the apparent en route collision of a US Air Force Lockheed C-141 Starlifter and a German air force Tupolev Tu-154 off the coast of Namibia. </p> <p>Admittedly, this is only one incident, and many of the facts have still to be confirmed, including whether indeed there was a collision. Yet the picture which is now being pieced together seems to confirm all the old fears about African air- traffic-control (ATC) procedures, or the lack of them. </p> <p>The C-141 had been heading out of the Namibian capital Windhoek, bound north-east towards the Ascension Islands. At the same time, the German transport was heading in from Niger airspace towards a refuelling stop at Windhoek. The last reported information suggests that they had both been heading towards the same route waypoint at the same height. </p>http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Back-to-basics-22757/