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  • Joint response: World Air Forces Directory introduction


    Air arms around the world reacted to multiple challenges during 2011, despite fleet and budget cuts. We list the current inventories and procurement plans of 160 nations.


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  • Joint response: World Air Forces Directory introduction


    Air arms around the world reacted to multiple challenges during 2011, despite fleet and budget cuts. We list the...


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  • Joint response: World Air Forces Directory introduction

    News | 14 Dec 2011 17:10 | Craig Hoyle

    Air arms around the world reacted to multiple challenges during 2011, despite fleet and budget cuts. We list the current inventories and procurement plans of 160 nations.http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Joint-response-World-Air-Forces-Directory-introduction-366005/
  • World Air Forces listing C-E

    News | 24 Nov 1999 00:00

    <p>CAMBODIA</p> <p>ROYAL CAMBODIAN AIR FORCE</p> <p>IAI of Israel has upgraded at least six of Cambodia's MiG-21s; however, while two aircraft were delivered in 1997, work on the other four was suspended waiting for Cambodia to pay IAI. The MiG-21-2000 upgrade includes a service life extension, a HUD, an improved weapons system and new cockpit, GPS-based navigation and Western communications equipment; the upgrade is understood also to include the Python 3 AAM and the Griffin LGB. It is thought the contract may cover conversion of nine single- seat and one twin-stick MiG-21. IAI also procured and modified six L-39 Albatros trainers for Cambodia; one was lost soon after delivery. Cambodia's difficulty in meeting the financial terms of its contract make it unlikely that the remaining MiG-21s, which are thought to be unserviceable, will be upgraded. </p> <p>Cambodia's other training type, the P92 Echo, is an Italian-built, high-wing trainer certificated to very light aircraft rules. Alhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/World-Air-Forces-listing-C-E-58979/
  • Cultural revolution

    News | 07 Oct 1997 23:00

    The Chinese air force struggles on with its long march to modernity <p>Douglas Barrie/London </p> <p>On paper, the Chinese air force is by far the greatest of Asia's Tigers, with its vast fleet of combat aircraft. In reality, it is closer to a woefully inadequate circus of museum pieces. </p> <p>The air force has somewhere in the region of 2,500 fighter aircraft on inventory, but the bulk of them are of a 1950s Soviet design heritage, and incapable of meeting the demands of air- warfare doctrine on the eve of the 21st century. </p> <p>None is more conscious of this than the air force itself, which is desperately keen to revamp its fleet with fourth-generation combat aircraft, as well as adopting an operational doctrine more suited to its role as the air force of the dominant regional power as it enters the next millennium. Efforts at renovation have been under way, albeit falteringly, since the middle of the 1980s. </p> <p>A decade later, the air force has found itself supportinghttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Cultural-revolution-24854/
  • Catching up

    News | 15 Nov 1995 00:00

    Large numbers of personnel and aircraft are no compensation for the Chinese air force's lack of modern technology. <p>Paul Lewis/BEIJING </p> <p>THE PEOPLE'S LIBERATION Army Air Force (PLAAF) of China has attracted considerable international attention in recent years. Reports of large-scale purchases of Russian arms, underwritten by double-digit defence budget hikes and spurred on by heightened tension in the South China Sea and across the Taiwan Straits, have all served to cast the world's third-largest air force in a rather sinister light. </p> <p>More detailed examinations of its organisation and capabilities, however, paint a rather more benign picture. A large fleet of increasingly obsolete fighters and bombers, a bloated force-structure and outdated operational doctrines, have given China's air force more than its fair share of post-Cold War headaches. </p> <p>The devastating use of modern air power in the 1991 Gulf War and, more recently, the Bosnian conflict has served tohttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Catching-up-23247/
  • Catching up

    News | 26 Sep 1995 23:00

    Large numbers of personnel and aircraft are no compensation for the Chinese air force's lack of modern technology. <p>Paul Lewis/BEIJING </p> <p>THE PEOPLE'S LIBERATION Army Air Force (PLAAF) of China has attracted considerable international attention in recent years. Reports of large-scale purchases of Russian arms, underwritten by double-digit defence budget hikes and spurred on by heightened tension in the South China Sea and across the Taiwan Straits, have all served to cast the world's third-largest air force in a rather sinister light. </p> <p>More detailed examinations of its organisation and capabilities, however, paint a rather more benign picture. A large fleet of increasingly, obsolete fighters and bombers, a bloated force structure and outdated operational doctrines, have given China's air force more than its fair share of post-Cold War headaches. </p> <p>The devastating use of modern air power in the 1991 Gulf War and, more recently, the Bosnian conflict has served thttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Catching-up-24086/