Top News on Northern Air Cargo

  • IN FOCUS: Dynamic Aviation prepares for life after wartime


    US military requirements may have driven growth in its special-mission modifications during the past decade, but Dynamic Aviation is confident slashed defence spending can be compensated by commercial business


  • Other News for Northern Air Cargo

  • IN FOCUS: Dynamic Aviation prepares for life after wartime


    US military requirements may have driven growth in its special-mission modifications during the past decade, but...


  • News Listings for Northern Air Cargo

  • IN FOCUS: Dynamic Aviation prepares for life after wartime

    News | 25 Jun 2012 00:00 | John Croft

    US military requirements may have driven growth in its special-mission modifications during the past decade, but Dynamic Aviation is confident slashed defence spending can be compensated by commercial businesshttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/IN-FOCUS-Dynamic-Aviation-prepares-for-life-after-wartime-373105/
  • NBAA: NetJets to help FAA verify efficiency gains with WAAS

    News | 21 Oct 2010 15:00 | John Croft

    A series of pilot programs are beginning to generate data the US FAA hopes will confirm what it says are "dramatic savings in fuel, reductions in flight times and less variability in navigation."http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/NBAA-NetJets-to-help-FAA-verify-efficiency-gains-with-WAAS-348661/
  • Northern Air Cargo gets first converted ATR 42

    News | 13 Oct 2003 23:00

    <p>US freight operator Northern Air Cargo has received the first large freight-door equipped ATR 42, following US Federal Aviation Administration certification of the Aeronavali conversion late last month. The Alenia Aeronautica/ Finmeccanica company has already developed the cargo door modification for the larger ATR 72, which is certificated in Europe and in service with Swiss operator Farnair Europe.</p>http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Northern-Air-Cargo-gets-first-converted-ATR-42-172433/
  • Turboprops offered door to future

    News | 12 Aug 2002 23:00

    <p>Efforts are under way to ensure a long-term future for large turboprop airliners through freight door conversions of the ATR family and BAe ATP. Large cargo door conversions of airliners from both manufacturers made public debuts at last month's Farnborough air show. </p> <p>The ATP freighter is being developed by cargo airline West Air Sweden in conjunction with BAE Systems, with conversions carried out at the airline's facilities in Lidk&icirc;ping, Sweden. The freighter version has an 8,500kg (18,700lb) payload and can carry up to eight LD3 or five LD4 containers and pallets. The installation of the 6 x 1.7m high (104 x 68in) cargo door and E Class cargo interior is priced at $1 million. </p> <p>West Air has eight ATPs in service and intends to install the door on additional aircraft at a rate of four a year. Its ATP freighters are marketed to operators on a cost per hour basis. </p> <p>The aircraft offers a similar capability to the freighter version of the ATR 72, but "the Ahttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Turboprops-offered-door-to-future-153275/
  • Buoyant ATR chalks up string of new orders

    News | 24 Jul 2002 23:00

    <p>ATR is at Farnborough in buoyant mood with a string of new orders secured during the show – seven yesterday – and a firm belief that it is well positioned to weather the post-11 September industry downturn. </p> <p>The Franco-Italian manufacturer yesterday confirmed a four-aircraft order from Alaska-based Northern Air Cargo for the large cargo door freighter version of the ATR 72, and predicted a market for about 100 ATR 42/72 freighters over the next 10 years. </p> <p>Yesterday also saw three new orders from Bangkok Airways, for ATR 72-500 aircraft. </p> <p>Earlier in the show, ATR announced several orders: three ATR 72-500s for Alitalia, five ATR 42-500s (one new and four second-hand aircraft) for LOT Polish Airlines and one ATR 72-500 for Air New Zealand. </p> <p>&quot;This year is particularly marked by the aftermath of 11 September,&quot; said Jean-Michel Leonard, ATR chief executive. &quot;This tragic event led to strong consequences for the commercial aviation business anhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Buoyant-ATR-chalks-up-string-of-new-orders-152802/
  • Beating the odds

    News | 23 Oct 2000 23:00

    With its poor safety record, Alaska is an ideal place to test new navigation and situational awareness technology Chris Kjelgaard/BETHEL, ALASKA <p>As far north as Helsinki, as far west as Hawaii and a 3h jet flight from the nearest large urban centre, Alaska's biggest city, Anchorage, is as remote as any community of its size on earth. </p> <p>Short summers, lots of cloud precipitated by the mountains that surround Anchorage on three sides, and long, hard winters make the location of this city of 250,000 people inhospitable. Yet compared with the small western Alaska town of Bethel, 650km (400 miles) west and situated 65km inland on the Kuskokwim River, Anchorage seems easily accessible and its climate forgiving. No roads link Bethel with the outside world. </p> <p>Founded by Moravian missionaries in the mid-19th century, Bethel lies at the farthest point up-river that is navigable by large cargo barge. Because of this proximity to the Kuskokwim, which residents use as an ice roadhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Beating-the-odds-121746/