Top News on Shenyang J-6

  • CHINA SPECIAL: Air force rejuvenation gathers steam


    China's reverse engineering skills are improving and its air force is being rejuvenated. But can its subsystems match its airframes?


  • News Listings for Shenyang J-6

  • CHINA SPECIAL: Air force rejuvenation gathers steam

    News | 08 Nov 2010 10:00 | Siva Govindasamy

    China's reverse engineering skills are improving and its air force is being rejuvenated. But can its subsystems match its airframes?http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/CHINA-SPECIAL-Air-force-rejuvenation-gathers-steam-349323/
  • Military Aircraft Census - Military might

    News | 20 Feb 2001 00:00

    <I><p>Flight International's</I> inaugural Military Aircraft Census reveals the make-up, breadth and scale of the world's airborne fighting fleets </p> <p>Stewart Penney/LONDON </p> <p>Flight International's first military aircraft census shows that the world's air arms operate nearly 90,000 aircraft. This figure includes VIP aircraft, essentially unmodified airliners or corporate jets which are not included in the tables. It does, however, give a feel for the size of the world's military aircraft fleet. </p> <p>Leaving aside the Mikoyan MiG-19 and its Chinese copy, the Shenyang J/F-6, the Lockheed Martin F-16 is the world's most popular fighter with well over 4,000 aircraft delivered or on order. The MiG-19/J-6 is in service in massive numbers with the Chinese air force with many believed to be unserviceable. As this skews the numbers, the fighter is omitted from consideration as the world's most popular fighter. The F-16 total includes every variant from early A/Bs to the Blockhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Military-Aircraft-Census-Military-might-126316/
  • World Air Forces listing C-E

    News | 24 Nov 1999 00:00

    <p>CAMBODIA</p> <p>ROYAL CAMBODIAN AIR FORCE</p> <p>IAI of Israel has upgraded at least six of Cambodia's MiG-21s; however, while two aircraft were delivered in 1997, work on the other four was suspended waiting for Cambodia to pay IAI. The MiG-21-2000 upgrade includes a service life extension, a HUD, an improved weapons system and new cockpit, GPS-based navigation and Western communications equipment; the upgrade is understood also to include the Python 3 AAM and the Griffin LGB. It is thought the contract may cover conversion of nine single- seat and one twin-stick MiG-21. IAI also procured and modified six L-39 Albatros trainers for Cambodia; one was lost soon after delivery. Cambodia's difficulty in meeting the financial terms of its contract make it unlikely that the remaining MiG-21s, which are thought to be unserviceable, will be upgraded. </p> <p>Cambodia's other training type, the P92 Echo, is an Italian-built, high-wing trainer certificated to very light aircraft rules. Alhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/World-Air-Forces-listing-C-E-58979/
  • Catching up

    News | 15 Nov 1995 00:00

    Large numbers of personnel and aircraft are no compensation for the Chinese air force's lack of modern technology. <p>Paul Lewis/BEIJING </p> <p>THE PEOPLE'S LIBERATION Army Air Force (PLAAF) of China has attracted considerable international attention in recent years. Reports of large-scale purchases of Russian arms, underwritten by double-digit defence budget hikes and spurred on by heightened tension in the South China Sea and across the Taiwan Straits, have all served to cast the world's third-largest air force in a rather sinister light. </p> <p>More detailed examinations of its organisation and capabilities, however, paint a rather more benign picture. A large fleet of increasingly obsolete fighters and bombers, a bloated force-structure and outdated operational doctrines, have given China's air force more than its fair share of post-Cold War headaches. </p> <p>The devastating use of modern air power in the 1991 Gulf War and, more recently, the Bosnian conflict has served tohttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Catching-up-23247/
  • Catching up

    News | 27 Sep 1995 00:00

    Large numbers of personnel and aircraft are no compensation for the Chinese air force's lack of modern technology. <p>Paul Lewis/BEIJING </p> <p>THE PEOPLE'S LIBERATION Army Air Force (PLAAF) of China has attracted considerable international attention in recent years. Reports of large-scale purchases of Russian arms, underwritten by double-digit defence budget hikes and spurred on by heightened tension in the South China Sea and across the Taiwan Straits, have all served to cast the world's third-largest air force in a rather sinister light. </p> <p>More detailed examinations of its organisation and capabilities, however, paint a rather more benign picture. A large fleet of increasingly, obsolete fighters and bombers, a bloated force structure and outdated operational doctrines, have given China's air force more than its fair share of post-Cold War headaches. </p> <p>The devastating use of modern air power in the 1991 Gulf War and, more recently, the Bosnian conflict has served thttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Catching-up-24086/