News Listings for Supermarine Swift

  • Flight 100 - History 1949-1958

    News | 02 Jan 2009 00:01 | Bill Gunston

    Despite its problems, the Comet was a revolution in air transport. But this would be a decade of firsts, many of them Britishhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Flight-100-History-1949-1958-320368/
  • Swiftly to Paris

    News | 08 Jul 2003 00:00

    <p>After being postponed from the preceding Wednesday by unsuitable weather, the attempt by a Supermarine Swift F.4 (Rolls-Royce Avon with reheat) on the London-Paris speed record was made - and with success - on Sunday last, July 5th. With Lt. Cdr. Michael Lithgow, Supermarine's chief test pilot, at the controls, the Swift took 19 min 5.6 sec for the trip to Paris, the average speed being 669.3 m.p.h. Later, after taking part in the air display at Le Bourget, it returned to London in 19 min 14.3 sec - at a speed of 664.3 m.p.h. The flights were made at a surprisingly low altitude - not much over 1,000ft. The previous London-Paris record was that set by the late Trevor ("Wimpy") Wade in a Hawker P.1052 in May, 1949, at a speed of 617.87 m.p.h.</p> <p>Speaking with a <I>Flight</I> representative at Le Bourget on arrival, Mr. Lithgow said that weather conditions had been good - especially at the English end. The reheat with which the Avon is fitted, he continued, was not in fact used duhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Swiftly-to-Paris-168581/
  • Straight and level - 05.06.1953

    News | 03 Jun 2003 00:00

    <p>Comet in Canada</p> <p>First de Havilland Comet to land on the North American continent, the Series 1A, number 5301, of the Royal Canadian Air Force arrived according to plan at Uplands Airport, Ottawa, last Friday. This Comet is one of two ordered by the R.C.A.F. for transport for fighter and radar affiliated exercises. Canadian Sabres were briefed to intercept the Comet over Montreal and to escort it to its historic landing at Uplands.</p> <p>The route selected for this first jet-transport crossing of the Atlantic was from London Airport to Keflavik (1,180 miles, flight-plan time 3 hr 15 min); Keflavik to Goose Bay (1,495 miles, time 4hr 15 min); Goose Bay to Ottawa (870 miles, time 2 hr 30 min). The total time for the journey of 3,545 miles was 10 hr 20 min, compared with the normal transport time of 16 to 18 hours. Landing time was 3.03 p.m. G.M.T.</p> <p>T.W. Hayhow</p> <p>As we briefly recorded last week, Tom Hayhow's Auster Aiglet - in which he had been attempting a Londohttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Straight-and-level-05061953-166343/
  • Farnborough 1948-1998:

    News | 07 Sep 1998 09:34

    <p>Geoff Thomas &nbsp;</p> <p>Mention 'Farnborough' or 'the old black sheds' to an aeroplane buff, and the resulting misty eyes and far-away expression give the game away. </p> <p>Over the past half-century, this little piece of Hampshire - only a few miles south-west of London - has regularly played host to a stunning display of innovation, excitement and sheer flying brilliance; words which have become synonymous with the Farnborough airshow. </p> <p>The airfield's claim to aviation fame is unequalled, for like nowhere else it's entitled to the epithet "cradle of British aviation". </p> <p>It was here in 1905, in a corner of Laffans Plain which straddles the Hampshire/Surrey border, that the British Government's balloon factory was sited. Three years later an entrepreneurial American-born adventurer by the name of Samuel 'Cowboy' Cody became the first person to make an official aeroplane flight in Great Britain.</p> <p>Renamed </p> <p>And so Farnborough became first the Army Aihttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Farnborough-1948-1998-41888/