Top News on Tachikawa

  • NASA commits to Shuttle missions to International Space Station


    <P><BR>NASA and its International Space Station (ISS) partners have agreed plans to reduce the number of Space Shuttle flights from&nbsp;the US agency's previously proposed 19 to 16, to ensure there is a realistic mission schedule in the years leading up to the Shuttle fleet's retirement in 2010.</P> <P>Yesterday the heads of national space agencies also endorsed the latest ISS configuration and the assembly sequence of Space Shuttle missions needed to complete the station by 2010.&nbsp; Not including two contingency flights, 16 Shuttle missions are now planned, with several science projects abandoned in favour of the delivery of essential components to the ISS. </P> <P>The ISS configuration changed because most&nbsp;of the station's modules&nbsp;were designed to be launched on&nbsp;Shuttles in a&nbsp;28-flight and assembly sequence. Due to the few remaining shuttle flights left, following Space Shuttle Columbia's loss in 2003,&nbsp;the Russian science power module and centrifuge mod


  • News Listings for Tachikawa

  • Tokyo Fire Department orders second EC225

    News | 03 Apr 2013 13:59 | Greg Waldron

    <p>The Tokyo Fire Department has ordered a second Eurocopter EC225 helicopter, which will be delivered in 2013.</p><p>The department's new 11-ton EC225 will...http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Tokyo-Fire-Department-orders-second-EC225-366440/
  • JAXA president outlines 2008 goals

    News | 10 Jan 2008 00:00 | Rob Coppinger

    Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) president Keiji Tachikawa has outlined his agency's goals for 2008, referring to...http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/JAXA-president-outlines-2008-goals-220679/
  • NASA commits to Shuttle missions to International Space Station

    News | 03 Mar 2006 12:00

    <P><BR>NASA and its International Space Station (ISS) partners have agreed plans to reduce the number of Space Shuttle flights from&nbsp;the US agency's previously proposed 19 to 16, to ensure there is a realistic mission schedule in the years leading up to the Shuttle fleet's retirement in 2010.</P> <P>Yesterday the heads of national space agencies also endorsed the latest ISS configuration and the assembly sequence of Space Shuttle missions needed to complete the station by 2010.&nbsp; Not including two contingency flights, 16 Shuttle missions are now planned, with several science projects abandoned in favour of the delivery of essential components to the ISS. </P> <P>The ISS configuration changed because most&nbsp;of the station's modules&nbsp;were designed to be launched on&nbsp;Shuttles in a&nbsp;28-flight and assembly sequence. Due to the few remaining shuttle flights left, following Space Shuttle Columbia's loss in 2003,&nbsp;the Russian science power module and centrifuge modhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/NASA-commits-to-Shuttle-missions-to-International-Space-Station-205237/
  • Japan launches H-2A

    News | 08 Mar 2005 00:00

    <p>Japan's H-2A booster was launched from Tanegashima on 26 February, after a 15-month grounding, placing the Loral-built MTSAT-1R multifunction satellite into geosynchronous transfer orbit. The H-2A failed in November 2003, after five successful launches, because of a fault in a strap-on solid rocket motor.</p> <p>MTSAT-1R is a replacement for MTSAT-1, which was destroyed in an H-2 launch failure in 1999, and will provide aeronautical satellite communications and space-based GPS augmentation for the Japan Civil Aviation Bureau and weather monitoring for the Japan Meteorological Agency. An MTSAT-2 is planned for launch next year.</p> <p>Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency president Keiji Tachikawa says the H-2A's reliability has been restored and the launcher is now competitive commercially. But the vehicle remains expensive, the latest launch costing ¥12 billion ($115 million), ¥3.5 billion more than the originally estimated launch cost.</p> <p>Boeing-led Sea Launch, meanwhile, plachttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Japan-launches-H-2A-194882/
  • Japan stalls future fighter demonstrator

    News | 21 Oct 1998 00:00

    <p>The Japan Defence Agency (JDA)has postponed plans to start work on a future fighter demonstrator next year, as it struggles to complete development flight testing of the new Mitsubishi F-2A/B support fighter by the end of 1999. </p> <p>The JDA's Technical Research and Development Institute (TRDI) had wanted to start work next year on the twin-engined demonstrator, variously designated as FI-X or TD-X. The aircraft, which was intended to fly by 2007, will test stealth, flight control and thrust-vectoring engine technologies. </p> <p>The 9m-long (29.5ft) demonstrator is seen as the possible basis for a future indigenously developed replacement for the Japan Air Self Defence Force's Mitsubishi-built McDonnell Douglas F-4J, and eventually its Boeing F-15EJs. The JDA had originally estimated the programme would cost some ´100 billion ($840 million). </p> <p>The TRDI has been funding work on an 11,200lb-thrust (50kN) demonstrator engine by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries (IHI) sinhttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Japan-stalls-future-fighter-demonstrator-44062/
  • Flutter and crack discoveries put F-2 tests behind schedule

    News | 05 Aug 1998 00:00

    <p>Completion of Japan Defence Agency (JDA) flight testing of the MitsubishiF-2A/B has slipped by nine months, following the discovery of excessive flutter and structural cracking of the fighter's composite wing. </p> <p>A three-year, four-phase flight test programme by the JDA's Technical Research and Development Institute (TRDI) and Japan Air Self-Defence Force (JASDF) had been scheduled for completion by March 1999. This has now been extended through to the end of the year. </p> <p>"The schedule has been delayed because we need to do more computer simulation testing," says the JDA. "Some parts, mainly in the wing, were found to have weak points near the pylons, so we will be conducting more tests on the F-2's main wing." it adds. </p> <p>The wing cracks were discovered in one of two test articles undergoing 6,000h of fatigue and structural load testing at the TRDI's Tachikawa facility. The F-2's composite wing has also displayed an excessive amount of flutter when carrying four phttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Flutter-and-crack-discoveries-put-F-2-tests-behind-schedule-40323/