News Listings for Yakovlev Yak-18

  • Russia takes steps to improve safety

    News | 12 Sep 2006 00:00 | David Kaminski-Morrow

    Pilot training central to civil aviation proposalshttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Russia-takes-steps-to-improve-safety-208979/
  • Pilot training central to Russian civil aviation safety proposals

    News | 04 Sep 2006 17:39 | David Kaminski-Morrow

    <body lang=EN-GB style='tab-interval:36.0pt'> <div class=Section1> <div> <div> <p class=MsoNormal style='mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto'><st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Russia</st1:place></st1:country-region></st1:place></st1:country-region>’s transport ministry has proposed to the Government a series of priority measures aimed at improving civil aviation safety in the wake of several high-profile fatal accidents in the past four months.</p> <p class=MsoNormal style='mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto'>These include supporting pilot training requirements, through the establishment of specialised academies and the acquisition of around 90 light aircraft, and lifting import restrictions on foreign aircraft.</p> <p class=MsoNormal style='mso-margin-top-alt:auto;mso-margin-bottom-alt:auto'>Russian transport minister Igor <span class=SpellE><span class=spelle>Levitin</span></span> has detailed the proposalshttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Pilot-training-central-to-Russian-civil-aviation-safety-proposals-295801/
  • Changing course

    News | 01 Jul 1998 00:00

    <img src='../Assets/GetAsset.aspx?ItemID=1166' /> Russia's Myasishchev has turned to general aviation in a bid to save its future <p>Paul Duffy/MOSCOW </p> <p>A general aviation aircraft named after a piece of porcelain carries the future hopes of Russian design bureau Myasishchev, more noted for the two large bombers it produced in the 1950s and 1960s and the M-17/M-55 high-altitude aircraft now used for research. Myasishchev was never particularly famous, even in the former Soviet Union, and its development work on advanced aerodynamics is little known. </p> <p>The bureau's departure from its usual business was prompted by the realisation that something had to be done if Myasishchev was to survive. General designer Valeri Novikov took that decision in 1991, knowing that budgets for military and research projects were shrinking - and unlikely to improve - and that other areas had to be found to generate work. </p> <p>The idea for the M101 Gzhel light turboprop (named after a piechttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Changing-course-38856/
  • Into the limelight

    News | 10 Sep 1997 00:00

    Despite the loss of the first prototype, Beriev's Be-103 shows great promise <p> </p> <p>Paul Duffy/TAGANROG </p> <p>Of the ten major ex-Soviet design bureaux, perhaps the least known to the outside world is Beriev. There are two main reasons for this. Firstly, Beriev is based in Taganrog, a relatively small city on the Sea of Azov coast, some 1,100km (680 miles) from Moscow. Secondly, over the last 65 years, it has specialised in "hydro aviation" - designing seaplanes and amphibians almost exclusively for the domestic market. </p> <p>It has branched out slightly from time to time - it worked on wing-in-ground-effect aircraft and it developed the Be-32 regional airliner, which was produced only as a prototype and development aircraft. It has also developed specialist versions of other types - for example, the A-50 reconnaissance/surveillance version of the Ilyushin Il-76. Two new aircraft developed by Beriev in the difficult political and economic climate of the 1990s may change thttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Into-the-limelight-20627/