News Listings for richard scott

  • UK defence cuts to force Sea King 7 life extension

    News | 18 Feb 2008 11:15

    Budget pressures could push the UK to extend the service lives of its Royal Navy Westland Sea King 7 airborne surveillance and control helicopters until 2022 ...http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/UK-defence-cuts-to-force-Sea-King-7-life-extension-221544/
  • Hawker Hunter Aviation's new model air force

    News | 17 Dec 2007 11:36 | Richard Scott

    NEW MODEL AIR FORCE Few British military aircraft of the jet age arouse such passion and endearment as the Hawker Hunter. Entering operational service...http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Hawker-Hunter-Aviations-new-model-air-force-220327/
  • Carrying the flag

    News | 07 Jun 2004 23:00

    <p>The UK's Invincible class aircraft carriers still have a decade in service ahead and the Royal Navy is determined to get the best out of them</p> <p>By the end of 2015 - assuming current programme and funding profiles hold firm - the UK Royal Navy (RN) should be operating two new Future Aircraft Carriers (CVFs) of 60,000t displacement each equipped with an air wing based around the new Joint Combat Aircraft (JCA) - the Lockheed Martin F-35B Joint Strike Fighter. </p> <p>But for the next decade, the service must strive to get the best out of its three existing Invincible class carriers (CVSs): HMS <I>Invincible</I>, HMS <I>Illustrious</I> and HMS <I>Ark Royal</I>. While somewhat constrained in size and configuration, these "legacy assets" are required to carry UK carrier air power forward into the CVF era - and in doing so realise the maximum potential of aviation packages drawing on carrier-compatible aircraft from across the RN, the Royal Air Force (RAF) and the British Army.</p>http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Carrying-the-flag-182670/
  • Sea change

    News | 09 Dec 2003 00:00

    <p>RICHARD SCOTT / RNAS CULDROSE</p> <p>The UK Royal Navy's Merlin maritime helicopter made its operational debut in a theatre far removed from that for which the aircraft was conceived</p> <p>A quarter of a century ago, when the Soviet submarine threat was the preoccupation of the UK Royal Navy, a requirement was raised for a new anti-submarine warfare (ASW) helicopter to operate from Invincible-class aircraft carriers and Type 23 frigates forming part of NATO's ASW striking force. Exploiting the extended detection ranges achieved by very low-frequency passive towed array sonar in the deep waters of the Greenland-Iceland-UK (GIUK) gap, this so-called Sea King Replacement (SKR) was envisaged as a sub-hunter supreme. </p> <p>Fast forward to early 2003. After a long and complex gestation, the SKR has manifested itself as the Merlin HM1, a three-engined 16t class maritime helicopter based on the EH101 air vehicle developed by AgustaWestland. The last aircraft off the production line hahttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Sea-change-174779/
  • Home on the range

    News | 19 Dec 2000 00:00

    Famed as the 'boneyard', the Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Centre seeks a more dynamic image <p>Richard Scott/TUCSON</p> <p>Everybody in Tucson knows the "boneyard". Sprawling across 6,400ha (2,600 acres) of desert on a site adjacent to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base (AFB), it is host to almost 4,600 military aircraft held in open storage for the US Department of Defense (DoD) and other US Government agencies. </p> <p>Visitors to the Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Center (AMARC), the facility's correct name, are greeted with the awesome, if somewhat eerie, sight of row upon row of aircraft put out to grass under the baking Arizona sun. Think of an aircraft in the inventory of the US armed services over the last 30 years, and chances are it is here. </p> <p>AMARC is also a place of pilgrimage for aviation enthusiasts from around the world. The Davis-Monthan AFB website even includes a listing of every aircraft by location, type and serial number so that former aircrehttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Home-on-the-range-123988/
  • Buying time

    News | 15 May 2000 23:00

    Kaman's SH-2F Seasprite has been a vital stepping stone for the Royal New Zealand Navy <p>Richard Scott/DEVONPORT NAVAL BASE, AUCKLAND </p> <p>In June, the Royal New Zealand Navy (RNZN) will begin handing back its interim Kaman SH-2F Seasprite helicopters as part of the transition to the new SH-2G(NZ) Super Seasprite, the definitive replacement for the retired Westland Wasp HAS1. </p> <IMG SRC="<img src='../Assets/GetAsset.aspx?ItemID=4264' />.gif" ALIGN="LEFT" HSPACE=12 WIDTH=300 HEIGHT=433> <p>It will have been a short-lived but productive career for the SH-2F that involved bridging the gap between the Wasp's demise and the Super Seasprite's introduction to service next year. Originally intended to provide the Naval Support Flight (administered and supported by 3 Squadron Royal New Zealand Air Force at Whenuapai) with lead-in familiarisation and continuation training, the SH-2F in fact ended up being deployed operationally last year in the Persian Gulf and off East Timor. </p>http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Buying-time-65639/