Boeing names Jones to replace Coyle as head of South Carolina site

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In a move geared toward accelerating the 787 into service entry and industrialisation, Boeing has moved two top executives to support its change incorporation and production ramp up operations.

Jack Jones will become VP and general manager of Boeing South Carolina, supporting 787 aft fuselage fabrication and centre fuselage integration, as well as the establishment of the company's new final assembly line, set to come online in July.

Jones' career at Boeing spans 31 years, and he most recently served as VP of the Everett delivery centre overseeing aircraft-on-ground, paint, pre-flight and delivery operations for Boeing widebody models.

He also spent a year beginning in March 2008 leading the team tasked with readying the Everett facility for 787 assembly.

Jones replaces Tim Coyle, who led the industrial integration of the North Charleston, South Carolina site after Boeing bought out suppliers Vought Aircraft Industries and Alenia Aeronautica in 2008 and 2009.

Vought was previously responsible for aft fuselage fabrication, as well as a 50% share of the centre fuselage integration at Global Aeronautica, a joint venture with Alenia.

Coyle, will lead operations at Boeing's Aviation Technical Services (ATS) site at its Everett facility, having recently expanded its lease of hangars from three to four to conduct change incorporation operations.

The move emphasises the aggressiveness with which Boeing is attacking the change incorporation operations of the unfinished 787 fleet currently in Everett, allowing the company to shift into delivering the dozens of aircraft in inventory.

Already at the ATS site is Airplane Eight, which is currently undergoing change incorporation and preparation for delivery, currently targeted for late July to Japan's All Nippon Airways.

Boeing is pairing its change incorporation operation in Everett with a similar operation in San Antonio, Texas already hosting Airplane 23, the first to deliver to Japan Airlines in October.