PICTURES: GE begins testing engine for China's regional jet

Washington DC
Source: Flightglobal.com
This story is sourced from Flightglobal.com

General Electric has begun ground testing the CF34-10A engine that will power China's AJR21-700 regional jet. The engine reached 70% of its maximum 20,000lb (89kN) thrust capability during the initial run at GE's outdoor test site in Peebles, Ohio.

The CF34-10A is about 80% common with the -10E engine already powering Embraer 190/195 large regional jets, says GE. Features include wide-chord fan blades, 3-D aerodynamic design of the high-pressure compressor airfoils, low-emissions combustor and single-stage high-pressure turbine.


                                                                                                               © GE Aviation

The first two flight-test engines are in final assembly at GE's Durham, North Carolina facility and will be tested at Peebles in November ready for shipment to China Aviation Industry (AVIC 1) in December. The first 90-seat ARJ21-700 is in final assembly at Shanghai Aircraft and is due for roll-out in December.

AVIC I Commercial Aircraft (ACAC) expects to fly the ARJ21 for the first time in March 2008, and is aiming for Chinese certification in the third quarter of 2009. GE is targeting US certification of the engine for late 2008. According to ACAC, CF34-10As to power the ARJ21 are to be assembled in Shenyang, China.


                                                                                                                © GE Aviation

The CF34-10A FETT - first engine to test - will perform initial performance calibration runs in October, says GE, after which it will be instrumented for fan vibration and crosswind operability certification testing. The engine is to be certificated at up to 18,500lb of thrust.

GE launched the CF34 on to the regional jet market in 1992 with the -3 model powering the Bombardier CRJ100, and has since delivered more than 3,600 engines. More than 1,200 of those are -8 models powering the CRJ700/900 and E-170/175, while more than 200 -10E engines are in service on the E-190/195.