SAS rolls out new strategy and management team

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SAS has announced a new management team and responsibilities as it introduces a new strategy out to 2015.

Under the title 4Excellence, the Scandinavian carrier will aim for excellence in the areas of sales, operations, commercial and people.

This follows on from the previous Core SAS strategy, which saw the carrier divesting non-essential activities and lowering its unit costs by 23% since 2008.

As a result of the new strategy, and in light of SAS changing from a holding structure with several subsidiaries to one functionally organised airline, president and chief executive Rickard Gustafson has announced a shake-up in senior management.

"I have decided to appoint a broader management group with responsibilities that are clearly based on the four excellence areas in the strategy," said Gustafson.

As well as Gustafson, the top echelon will consist of deputy president and chief financial officer Goran Jansson, deputy president Henriette Fenger Ellekrog (responsible for human resources and communication), Flemming Jensen (operations), Benny Zakrisson (infrastructure) and chief legal officer Mats Lonnkvist.

New heads of commercial and sales & marketing will be appointed no later than March 2012.

As a result, deputy president John Dueholm and chief commercial officer Robin Kamark will leave SAS.

Dueholm is leaving as planned now that Core SAS has been completed, but will stay until spring 2012 and remain as spokesman for subsidiaries Wideroe and Blue1 as well as acting as advisor to Gustafson.

Kamark will continue in his post with responsibility for commercial functions as a whole at SAS until the two new heads are appointed. "When new structures are established and when an organisation changes, you should always ask yourself if you want to be part of the future organisation," said Kamark. "After careful consideration, I have decided I would like to pursue my career outside SAS."

Gustafson commented that Kamark had worked "incredibly hard for SAS" and welcomed the continued advice he would receive from Dueholm over the next few months.