TriaGnoSys dramatically reduces cost of satellite calls

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Germany's TriaGnoSys has launched ultra-efficient satellite communications compression software called VoCem, which can be used for all forms of remote communications systems, including passenger and crew GSM and voice over IP (VoIP) services on aircraft.

At present, VoIP calls use up to 96 kbit/s and GSM use up to 30 kbit/s. Using TriaGnoSys' VoCeM product, each call will only use 6 kbit/s, says the German firm.

Satellite costs are therefore reduced significantly, "meaning call costs for the end user can be much lower".

In addition to reducing the kbit rate for calls, VoCem also increases the number of simultaneous calls each satellite link can handle. Using the VoCeM compressor, Inmarsat or Ku-band payload usage can be increased by a factor of between five and 10.

The VoCeM software has been designed to be installed on existing GSM, 3G/UMTS and VoIP communications servers.

"Anyone already providing either GSM or VoIP services on ships, planes or in remote areas on land knows how important those services are," says TriaGnoSys managing director Axel Jahn.

"What we can do with VoCeM is cut call costs and increase the number of simultaneous calls available. And all it takes is a simple software upgrade. It is not magic - it is the application of state of the art transcoding and compression techniques combined with innovative kilobit transmission technology."

TriaGnoSys is perhaps best known in the in-flight entertainment and connectivity (IFE&C) industry for supplying the software behind the Airbus/SITA partnership OnAir's onboard GSM mobile phone solution, which uses Inmarsat's SwiftBroadband satcom.

However, TriaGnoSys also recently made headlines when it teamed with T-Mobile, VT Miltope, and ViaSat to offer a Ku-band satellite broadband and GSM telephony service for air transport.

The T-Mobile-led team is involved in discussions with Lufthansa in relation to finalizing a contract that would reinstate Ku-band-based connectivity services on the carrier's overseas flights.