Advertising
  • News
  • Defence
  • Manufacturers & Airframes
  • Norway starts F-35 braking parachute tests

Norway starts F-35 braking parachute tests

Norway has begun testing of the braking parachute it will employ on its fleet of Lockheed Martin F-35As.

Initial efforts at Edwards AFB in California will focus on how the Joint Strike Fighter handles with the parachute fitted, as well as braking on both dry and wet runways. A later phase, running until early 2018 at Eielson AFB in Alaska, will evaluate its performance on icy runways.

All trials will be performed with test aircraft AF-2, the Norwegian defence ministry says.

It is sharing the development and integration costs for the system with the Netherlands, which is also acquiring the conventional take-off and landing F-35A.

Modifications include strengthening the fuselage and adapting the aircraft to house the parachute between the two tailfins.

Oslo cites the extreme weather conditions its aircraft typically operate in – which include low temperatures, strong winds, poor visibility and slippery runways – as key reasons for needing the parachute.

"Being able to operate fighter aircraft under varying weather conditions is critical for our operational capability," says defence minister Øystein Bø.

The first F-35 will arrive in Norway in November 2017, the ministry says.

Advertising

Advertising